ADH

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antidiuretic hormone

antidiuretic hormone (ănˌtēdīyo͞orĕtˈĭk), polypeptide hormone secreted by the posterior pituitary gland. Its principal action is to regulate the amount of water excreted by the kidneys. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH), known also as vasopressin, causes the kidneys to resorb water directly from the renal tubules, thus concentrating the salts and waste products in the liquid, which will eventually become urine. ADH secretion by the pituitary is regulated by neural connections from the hypothalamus, which is believed to monitor either the volume of blood passing through it or the concentration of water in the blood. Dehydration or body stress will raise ADH secretion and water will be retained. Alcohol inhibits ADH secretion. Failure of the pituitary to produce ADH results in diabetes insipidus. In pharmacological doses ADH acts as a vasoconstrictor. The structure and chemical synthesis of ADH was announced (1953) by Nobel laureate Vincent Du Vigneaud and others.
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ADH

(biochemistry)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ADH

On drawings, abbr. for adhesive.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The cases of atypical ductal hyperplasia associated with cancer reached a peak of 4.3 per 10,000 mammograms in 2003, but decreased to 3.3 in 2005.
In contrast, patients who were premenopausal when they had a breast biopsy showing atypical ductal hyperplasia had a 2.59-fold increased risk of subsequent breast cancer, whereas those who were postmenopausal at the time of their benign biopsy had a 4.04-fold increased breast cancer risk, Dr.
Estrogen receptor and cytokeratin 5 are reliable markers to separate usual ductal hyperplasia from atypical ductal hyperplasia and low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ.
That worked out to an adjusted odds ratio for developing breast cancer of 2.76 for women with atypical ductal hyperplasia, 5.24 for those with atypical lobular hyperplasia, and 8.12 for women with both histologic abnormalities, she continued.
(19) Specifically, 25 years after a diagnosis of atypical hyperplasia (atypical ductal hyperplasia and ALH) on biopsy, breast cancer (in situ or invasive) developed in 29% of women.
Can mammographic findings help discriminate between atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ after needle core biopsy?
Additional objectives included determining the incidence of significant pathologic findings (SPF), defined as occult carcinoma and atypical hyperplasia (including atypical ductal hyperplasia [ADH] and atypical lobular hyperplasia [ALH]), in RMP specimens.
Fibroadenoma is commonest seen in 27 cases (43.54%), benign breast disease in 15 cases (24.19%) and atypical ductal hyperplasia in 04 cases (6.45%), breast abscess in 04 cases (6.45%), galactocele in 04 cases (6.45%), mastitis in 03 cases(4.83%), fibrocystic disease in 02 cases(3.22%), intraductal papilloma in one case(1.61%), phylloides in one case (1.61%).
Biopsies that showed atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, lobular carcinoma in situ, or flat epithelial atypia were grouped as atypical epithelial lesions.
(5,6) Common atypical pathologic findings in complex cystic breast masses include atypical ductal hyperplasia and atypical papilloma.
Usual ductal hyperplasia (UDH) and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH)/low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (LG-DCIS) are biologically distinct, intraductal, epithelial proliferations with different clinical implications.

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