Audience

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Audience

 

(1) An official personal reception by the head of state (king, president), Roman pope, and the like.

(2) In international law, the reception by the head of state for the chief of a diplomatic mission, as well as for the chief of a foreign mission or of an international organization which is located in the given state. The chiefs of diplomatic missions and special missions, regardless of their class or rank, have the right to an audience. Moreover, an audience, as a rule, is given when credentials or letters of recall are presented or upon the request of the chief of a mission or of a special mission.

What does it mean when you dream about an audience?

If the dreamer is in front of an audience, this could reflect a situation in one’s environment in which one feels that one is attracting more attention than usual. It could also represent anxiety about being exposed. If one dreams about being in an audience, one might be witnessing something about oneself or some aspect of one’s life.

References in classic literature ?
The audience yelled its appreciation of Danny's display of sporting spirit.
What the audience neglected to see was the deep chest.
I was asked now to speak to an audience composed of the wealth and culture of the white South, the representatives of my former masters.
About it, on three sides, the ordinary part of the audience had stood during the performance, while the inn-guests and persons able to pay a fixed price had sat in the open galleries which lined the building and ran all around the yard.
She was an interested party in what seemed a death-struggle--was not one of the fighters her Joe?--but the audience understood and she did not.
The one member of the audience who looked at her and listened to her coldly, was her elder sister.
"I beg pardon--Ladies, Gentlemen, and Children--I must apologize, I had inadvertently omitted a considerable section of this audience" (tumult, during which the Professor stood with one hand raised and his enormous head nodding sympathetically, as if he were bestowing a pontifical blessing upon the crowd), "I have been selected to move a vote of thanks to Mr.
Matai Shang was wise enough to seem to accept the mandate of his follower, and promised to bring the two slave women to the audience chamber on the morrow.
She was so pale that Diana and Jane, down in the audience, clasped each other's hands in nervous sympathy.
And then a man sprang to his feet in the audience, and raising his hand on high, cried: "Justice!
If not the greatest actor of his day, Kynaston was the greatest of the 'boy-actresses.' So exalted was his reputation 'that,' says Downes, 'it has since been disputable among the judicious, whether any woman that succeeded him so sensibly touched the audience as he.'"
His audience applauded him--and so, for that time, the skirmish ended.