acoustic feedback

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acoustic feedback

[ə′küs·tik ′fēd‚bak]
(engineering acoustics)
The reverberation of sound waves from a loudspeaker to a preceding part of an audio system, such as to the microphone, in such a manner as to reinforce, and distort, the original input. Also known as acoustic regeneration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recorded audio feedback offers an efficient and effective way to provide rich, detailed feedback and suggestions not requiring two-way communication.
Action Target custom designed three targets for the competition featuring spring‐loaded armor steel head plates that provide extra bounce for immediate visual and audio feedback.
Self-reports showed older drivers favored audio feedback while younger drivers relied more on visual feedback.
Kim said this may have to do with driver preference; self-reports showed older drivers favoured audio feedback while younger drivers relied more on visual feedback.
The individualized support afforded by the audio feedback reduces a child's embarrassment at not knowing words.
The FLY pentop computer is an electronic personal learning tool that gives users real-time audio feedback as they touch, write, and draw on special FLY interactive paper, making what they write really work.
Featuring an in-ear heart rate monitor and a touch control for on-demand access to your heart rate, the UA Sport Wireless Heart Rate allows athletes to access real-time information they need to maximize their workout including heart rate tracking with audio feedback and heart rate zone coaching, powered by UA RecordTM.
Yet, opening night was marred by mic scratches and irritating reverb and infuriating audio feedback. Ampil even had to do her first scene with a handheld microphone, which came several inaudible lines too late.
For giving feedback to students on assignments, audio feedback has been used by instructors even in face-to-face classes.
Audio feedback confirms the points measured are sufficient for a given step in the part program.
The kit comprises a sensor which is embedded into the sole of a purpose-built Nike shoe, and a receiver that plugs into the base of the iPod Nano that allows users to track their performance from the iPod through audio feedback.