audio frequency

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Related to Audio frequencies: Sound frequency

audio frequency:

see soundsound,
any disturbance that travels through an elastic medium such as air, ground, or water to be heard by the human ear. When a body vibrates, or moves back and forth (see vibration), the oscillation causes a periodic disturbance of the surrounding air or other medium that
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; radioradio,
transmission or reception of electromagnetic radiation in the radio frequency range. The term is commonly applied also to the equipment used, especially to the radio receiver.
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.
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audio frequency

[¦ȯd·ē·ō ¦frē·kwən·sē]
(acoustics)
A frequency that can be detected as a sound by the average young adult, approximately 15 to 20,000 hertz. Abbreviated af. Also known as sonic frequency; sound frequency.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

audio frequency

Any frequency of oscillation of a sound wave which is audible; usually in the range between 15 and 20,000 Hz (cycles per second).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

audio frequency

Frequencies between 15 Hz and 25 kHz, which are audible to the human ear.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

audio frequency

a frequency in the range 20 hertz to 20 000 hertz. A sound wave of this frequency would be audible to the human ear
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This method is based on measuring the intensity of different audio frequencies the patient is still able to hear and creating appropriate tables and audiometric curves.
Since no intrinsic minimum frequency limit exists, the amplifier can be used at or below audio frequencies.
Of course, the telephone is not designed to reproduce audio frequencies as faithfully as your home stereo system.
By using audio frequencies, transmission may be by telephone wires.
The first network translates the written text into a spectrogram which is a visual representation of audio frequencies over time.
[Editor's Note: In Issue 89's "Skeptimania' column the statement was made that Better Cables' Silver Serpent cable "appears to have a characteristic impedance of 150 ohms, which is meaningless for audio frequencies. However, I would not recommend it for long 75-ohm video applications, although in short lengths it may be OK." We hereby retract that statement, and apologize both to Better Cables, LLC =and to our readers for any confusion or misunderstanding it may have caused.