audit

(redirected from Auditability)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.

audit

[′ȯd·ət]
(computer science)
The operations developed to corroborate the evidence as regards authenticity and validity of the data that are introduced into the data-processing problem or system.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

audit

a process in which the performance of organizations is monitored by independent agencies. Compared with direct observation and control of behaviour (see SURVEILLANCE), audit usually does its work by an examination of the records of the processes and/or outcomes of organizational activity Audits are a prominent part of what has been termed the ‘new governance’ in contemporary advanced societies. As well as the more familiar financial audits of business organizations, there are today organizational audits of hospitals, schools and universities as well as environmental audits. See also AUDIT SOCIETY.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Audit

 

a check of the business and financial activity of enterprises, organizations, institutions, or individual officials for a certain period of time; one of the forms of subsequent review.

In the USSR all state and cooperative enterprises are audited. The audit is generally conducted once a year; organizations that do not directly conduct business operations must be audited at least once every two years. When necessary an audit may be made at any time (surprise audit). Audits are included in the functions of agencies of state control and intradepartmental control agencies. They were instituted by the Apr. 15, 1936, decree of the Soviet of Peoples’ Commissars of the USSR entitled Intradepartmental Financial Control and Auditing of Institutions, Enterprises, Economic Organizations, and Construction Projects.

The purposes and general procedure of the audit are regulated by governmental resolutions and departmental instructions. The primary purposes of the audit are to check fulfillment of state plans; check the legality of economic transactions and compliance with financial and estimate discipline; monitor the security of socialist property; check the correctness of bookkeeping records and the quality of documentary records underlying bookkeeping entries; and check the correctness of materials accounting in storage business. Auditing helps uncover abuses, unused reserves, and losses owing to unproductive use of time and identifies positive experience in the work of the organizations being audited, thus promoting stronger business accountability and economy measures.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

audit

(1) A formal examination by certified auditors of systems, programming, operations and security to determine compliance with internal policies and procedures or with external standards. An audit is often used to satisfy legal requirements of regulatory agencies and laws. See assessment, COBIT, COSO, ISO/IEC 27000, SAS 70 and SSAE 16.

(2) An examination of systems, programming and datacenter procedures in order to determine the efficiency of computer operations.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then we propose a secure charging mechanism for vehicles with bidirectional auditability guarantee where vehicle is billed in a semisimultaneous manner on the per-plate basis.
In the Proposed System, we are implementing the Auditability -aware data scheduling privacy preserved third party auditing.
The committee's comment letter said the scope of the project is too broad, lacks definitive disclosure boundaries and fails to achieve proper balance between user needs and auditability considerations or cost-benefit constraints.
* Identify issues that arise in transaction processing that may cause auditability related issues;
24, were designed to lure Northrop Grumman into the bidding, but if the company passes on bidding, only Boeing would be in the bidding, leaving insufficient insight and auditability. Mar 1, 2010
"These are auditability, version control, archiving, reporting, plus critical elements of the procurement workflow that include approvals, sign-off, contracts and procedure, amongst others.
It creates logs and time stamps for every step of the process to provide customers with auditability and compliance with organisational policies and industry regulations.
John Purple, a life actuary with the Connecticut insurance department, asked for the development of a practice note to ensure auditability of company models.
"She earned money in a vacuum of accountability and auditability.
State compliance and auditability are new concerns, so companies are looking at ways to have redundancy and capability in their systems.
In addition, the solutions help companies comply with mounting government regulations by ensuring consistency and auditability, and by providing visibility into the decisioning process, according to Sarvesh Mahesh, Tavant Technologies' chief executive officer.