Augustan


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Augustan

1. characteristic of, denoting, or relating to the Roman emperor Augustus Caesar (63 bc--14 ad), his period, or the poets, notably Virgil, Horace, and Ovid, writing during his reign
2. of, relating to, or characteristic of any literary period noted for refinement and classicism, esp the late 17th century in France (the period of the dramatists Corneille, Racine, and Molière) or the 18th century in England (the period of Swift, Pope, and Johnson, much influenced by Dryden)
3. an author in an Augustan Age
4. a student of or specialist in Augustan literature
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
While there's little question that writers like Swift, Fielding, and Johnson had a major impact on Austen's satirical style, there are more than enough compelling chronological, stylistic, and methodological problems with the "Augustan Austen" to dispense with this reckoning of her altogether.
A dazzling production of Die Zauberflote at Les Choregies d'Orange was well served by Gilles Bouillon's inventive direction as he dealt with the imposing Augustan Wall for the first time.
Hughes's ideas were imposing; he envisioned an Augustan showcase of art that would go against the grain of contemporary trends.
Other sites that have reopened over the past six to eight weeks include the well-preserved 18th Century parish church at Llangar; Montgomery Castle built by Henry III in 1223; Valle Crucis Abbey, the Cistercian abbey founded in 1201 near Llangollen; and Caerleon Amphitheatre which is part of the legionary fortress of Isca - the permanent base in Britain of the 2nd Augustan Legion from AD75.
In particular, the book aims to strip away the accretions of Augustan stereotype--actually part of an "elite backlash" to enthusiastic rhetoric--that too often still surround our understanding of this language.
Claeys continues to promote the accessibility of utopian works to our students, not to mention ourselves, with his latest edited volume, Restoration and Augustan British Utopias, which compiles in a single volume eight important texts dating from 1660 through 1701.
For Canadian judges to say that the unborn child is a part of its mother is completely absurd; the Romans, the Elizabethans, the citizens of Augustan England knew better, even though they did not have the benefit of modern science to tell them that the baby has its own unique DNA.
Dryden was the earliest born, in 1631, of the great Augustan prose writers and died just as the new century began.
Long before Dawkins or Sagan, in Augustan Rome, lived Lucretius, the Epicurean poet-philosopher whose "De Rerum Natura" ("The Way Things Are") greatly influenced Virgil.
Andrew Wallace-Hadrill's excellent introductory chapter and the pieces by Barbara Kellum (on the `gendering' of Augustan monumental architecture) and Philip Hardie (on issues of succession and authority in Ovid, Metamorphoses 15) are notable exceptions; but, while many of the authors have made useful and interesting contributions in their own fields, the volume does not really add up to the `holistic approach to the Augustan Cultural Revolution' promised in the blurb.
He portrays the divines of the Augustan age as engaged in vigorous and complex theological debate in which credal orthodoxy and Counter-Enlightenment found just as many champions as Deism and Latitudinarianism.
Jane Allison, who is assistant and sister-in-law to trainer Brian Meehan, took the spoils on Rare Talent trained by Steve Gollings, who was also responsible for the fourth, Augustan.