Augustan

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Augustan

1. characteristic of, denoting, or relating to the Roman emperor Augustus Caesar (63 bc--14 ad), his period, or the poets, notably Virgil, Horace, and Ovid, writing during his reign
2. of, relating to, or characteristic of any literary period noted for refinement and classicism, esp the late 17th century in France (the period of the dramatists Corneille, Racine, and Molière) or the 18th century in England (the period of Swift, Pope, and Johnson, much influenced by Dryden)
3. an author in an Augustan Age
4. a student of or specialist in Augustan literature
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Kuzis manages the State Police as it is defined and maintained by the state, so the public statements made by the minister are populistic and sometimes verge on interfering in the work of the State Police, Augustans said.
The new ethos was satiric and classical, public and authoritative--the Augustan modes and manners were much harder for women to maneuver in.
Wood's halfpence was only one example of the predominance of the moneyed interest, which, like other Augustans, Swift abominated.
Before turning to Four Quartets, he identifies the Augustans, specifically Dryden and Pope, as Eliot's precursors in the verse essay.
Robin Edward Sowerby (English Studies, University of Stirling, Scotland) presents several 17th-century translations of the work of Virgil, which are shown to be the sources of the style of the later English Augustans. The makes widely available for the first time Sir John Denham's 1636 translation of books 2-6 of Virgil's Aeneid, as well as his translation of The Destruction of Troy.
Political Apollo: From Callimachus to the Augustans. Mnemosyne 45.4:501-12.
In the remainder of this essay, I would like to begin formulating ways of differentiating Austen's "outsider" satire from the "insider" satire of Augustans like Swift, Gay, and Pope.
Such an undertaking allowed insurance companies to reap the benefits of compound interest which acquired a special mystique for English Augustans. On a more technical level Clark defines types of early insurance--contributorships, mortuary tontines, premium insurance and reversionary annuity companies--and chronicles the growth of such landmark businesses as the Royal Exchange Assurance Corporation and London Assurance Corporation at the beginning of the eighteenth century, the Equitable Society of mid-century and the Westminster and Pelican which appeared at century's end.
Thus the gusto and vigor of the Elizabethans have been seen as continuing in Milton and the other seventeenth-century masters of baroque prose, then as being passed along to the early Augustans who brought the native energy of language under control without extinguishing it.
But it isn't only Middleton's interest in female roles and market forces which has made his work so responsive to contemporary interests - and which, disappointingly for readers of Steen's book, made him so comparatively inaccessible to the Augustans and Victorians with whom she largely deals.
Weinbrot ends by asserting, in a nicely paradoxical way, that Macpherson had much in common with such preeminent "Augustans" as Dryden and Samuel Johnson, despite the fact that the latter did his best to expose Macpherson as a literary crook.
Deidre Lynch's thoughtful opening essay entitled "'A Genius for Foretelling': Augustan Austen and Future Fiction" starts by examining the periodicities of Austen's fiction, and emphasises the difficulties of placing her in any single age.