Augustinians


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Augustinians,

religious order in the Roman Catholic Church. The name derives from the Rule of St. Augustine (5th cent.?), which established rules for monastic observance and common religious life. The canons regular, made up of ordained clergy, adopted this rule in the 11th cent. and became known as Augustinian, or Austin, canons. Augustinian canons pursue a life of poverty, celibacy, and obedience without withdrawing from the world. Subsequent orders of canons regular, such as the Premonstratensians, are outgrowths of the Augustinians. The Austin friars are an entirely different group of religious, dating from the 13th cent. (see friarfriar
[Lat. frater=brother], member of certain Roman Catholic religious orders, notably, the Dominicans, Franciscans, Carmelites, and Augustinians. Although a general form of address in the New Testament, since the 13th cent.
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). Officially known as Hermits of St. Augustine, they now exist in three independent branches—the Calced Augustinian Hermits, the more austere and less numerous Discalced Augustinian Hermits, and the Recollects of St. Augustine. There are also congregations of women corresponding to both canons and friars.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Claudia von Collani and Nicholas Standaert maintain that Spanish Augustinians contributed to the earliest Catholic missionary work and the propagation of Augustinian theology in Ming China.
"Love for Wisdom" brings us to the order's library which, despite the ravages of war many thousands of volumes were lost to Manila's sacking by the British and then to the city's bombardment in the Second World War still displays books dating back to the 1500s, proof of the Augustinian devotion to scholarship (particularly to linguistics, based on the exhibits).
She was an Augustinian mystic who lived at the turn of the 14th-15th centuries, and had a difficult life: she was a wife and mother of two sons but later became widowed, both her children dying as well.
The ceremony took place in front of many former members and players during the tea interval of a match between Augustinians and Augustinians Woodhouse (both part of the club).
This complexity deeply affected the mission results achieved by the Augustinians, which among Muslims were few and far between.
Janis Elliot approaches the now lost but photographically preserved choir frescoes in the Augustinians' Eremitani, or hermitage church, in Padua.
The point at which the Whigs and Augustinians come into conflict is over the issue of the moral quality of what is called the "culture of America," which is not of course confined to the geographical boundaries of the United States.
The virtual cell is part of the Augustinians Lenten project Places Of Pain And Joy In A City and members of the public are invited to reflect on life behind bars.
The agreement followed a nine-month mediation process that included the Augustinians, the plaintiffs and the Chicago archdiocese.