aurochs

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aurochs:

see cattlecattle,
name for the ruminant mammals of the genus Bos, and particularly those of the domesticated species, Bos taurus and B. indica. The term oxen, broadly used, refers also to closely related animals, such as the buffalo and the bison.
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aurochs

a recently extinct member of the cattle tribe, Bos primigenius, that inhabited forests in N Africa, Europe, and SW Asia. It had long horns and is thought to be one of the ancestors of modern cattle
References in periodicals archive ?
Auroch is focused on five prospecting license, which have been applied for, in Namibia which are highly prospective for lithium.
On the origin of cattle: How aurochs became cattle and colonized the world.
Hushpuppy's encounters with her peers, teacher, father, strangers, and the prehistoric Beasts, aurochs, are also seen from her particular viewpoint and they contain worldviews that are intelligent, wise and magical.
The Dutch scientists are using DNA samples from auroch bones and teeth to figure out its exact genetic code.
You're welcome to come along and also handle some original bones of an auroch, bison and giant deer.
Auroch is earning into the Area of Interest via an unincorporated Joint Venture Agreement.
Yet, if you could magically insert an ancient auroch into a random motley herd of beef cattle, few people would ever know the difference because your basic-model cow has changed little over the millennia.
The dozens of varieties of cattle raised today are all derived from the now-extinct auroch, which was used both for food and as a beast of burden from ancient times until the 17th century.
Animal prints will also feature in the museum's collections, left behind by roe deer, wolf and auroch - a now extinct type of large wild cattle.
On Smyntyna's reading, the beginning of auroch domestication is conceptualized not so much as an adaptive response to subsistence source base shortage, but rather as a phenomenon caused, together with joint exploitation of the same settlement area, by resource spatial distribution.
Dangling from the bucket of his machine was the intact skull and horns of an auroch, which is a species of wild cattle that stood 6ft at the shoulder.
The auroch - which had been hunted to extinction throughout Europe by the early 1600s - had not been seen on British soil for more than 4000 years before farmer Derek Gow decided to bring them back.