Austen


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Austen

Jane. 1775--1817, English novelist, noted particularly for the insight and delicate irony of her portrayal of middle-class families. Her completed novels are Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), Emma (1816), Northanger Abbey (1818), and Persuasion (1818)
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JASNA (Jane Austen Society of North America) member, VOYA reviewer, and school media specialist Christina Miller is York College (CUNY) Library's "High School Librarian," the library's liaison to the on-campus Queens High School for the Sciences at York College.
The Austen note will be issued as a Au10 note, within a year of the Churchill Au5 note, which is targeted for issue during 2016.
and a portrait of Austen commissioned by her nephew James Edward Austen Leigh, adapted from a sketch by her sister.
She sets out to demonstrate, with impeccably researched evidence and much reference to the novels, that the idea of Jane Austen that most people have is seriously mistaken.
Here, the critic avers, earnestness always denotes "moral seriousness" as a devotional counter by the Anglican Church to Evangelical challenges in the 1790s (190), with which Austen would have been much in sympathy.
Along with Shakespeare and Dickens, Jane Austen unites excellence with popularity; she is, in Brownstein's pithy appraisal, both great and delightful.
I] am considerably better now and recovering my looks a little, which have been bad enough, black and white and every wrong colour," Austen wrote in the letter.
Probably written in 1804, this heavily corrected draft represents the earliest surviving manuscript for a novel by Jane Austen.
What you learn from the book--or are reminded of, depending on your level of familiarity with Austen scholarship--is that Austen cared very much about her fame; that her family worried about the incompatibility of authorship and female virtue (a woman's reputation being inextricably linked to her sexual purity, as Lydia Bennet's case makes clear); and that once she attained a foothold in the public imagination, she ascended to the ranks of superstardom in two significant leaps, one at the end of the nineteenth century and the other one hundred years later.
Sutherland said the revelations shouldn't damage the reputation of Austen, who was little known when she died in 1817 at the age of 41 but has since become one of Britain's most beloved authors.
In the two centuries since Henry Austen made that assessment, curiosity about his sister's life, along with enthusiasm for her work, have reached a frenzied level, and her very name has become "an infinitely exploited global brand," as Claire Harman observes in her fascinating and beautifully written study of the shifts and changes in the novelist's reputation, Jane's Fame.
Of course, Jane Austen and Charles Darwin were similarly fascinated by the natural history of human beings.