Austerlitz


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Austerlitz

(ô`stərlĭts, Ger. ou`–), Czech Slavkov u Brna, town, S Czech Republic, in Moravia. An agricultural center, the town has sugar refineries and cotton mills. It became a seat of the Anabaptists in 1528. At Austerlitz, in the "battle of the three emperors," Napoleon I won (Dec. 2, 1805) his most brilliant victory by defeating the Russian and Austrian armies under Czar Alexander I and Emperor Francis II. The "sun of Austerlitz" (it was a cloudless day) became synonymous with the peak of Napoleon's fortunes. An armistice with Austria, concluded (Dec. 4) at Nikolsburg (now Mikulov), was followed by the Treaty of Pressburg. Russia continued the war but had to withdraw all troops from Austria. There is a famous description of the battle in Tolstoy's War and Peace. The town has an 18th-century castle, a 13th-century church, the Renaissance Church of the Resurrection, and the Monument of Peace (built 1910–11).

Austerlitz

Napoleon’s brilliant success over Austro-Russian coalition (1805). [Fr. Hist.: Harbottle Battles, 23–24]
See: Battle

Austerlitz

defeat of Austro-Russian coalition by Napoleon (1805). [Fr. Hist.: Harbottle Battles, 23–24]
See: Defeat

Austerlitz

a town in the Czech Republic, in Moravia: site of Napoleon's victory over the Russian and Austrian armies in 1805. Pop.: 4747 (latest est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the first mention of Austerlitz's name, or more accurately, the first repetition of the name we have read on the book's cover.
Austerlitz, however, rightly points out that the bongo player (unidentified) provides "kaleidoscopic counterpoint with Machito's inspiraciones" (sung improvisations, p.
Austerlitz e, das narrativas em prosa de Sebald, a que mais se aproxima da fisionomia tradicional de um romance.
Ao longo da obra de Sebald, descobriremos, conforme avancam as investigacoes e o processo de autodescoberta de Austerlitz, que o personagem era uma das criancas judias separadas de sua familia e levadas para a Inglaterra por meio dos Kindertransports as vesperas da eclosao da II Guerra Mundial.
Austerlitz is the most novelistic of the four narratives and the book many readers, myself included, regard as Sebald's masterpiece.
To facilitate this, Alfred Rosenberg created Mobel Aktion (Operation Furniture) and three special work camps in the center of Paris--Levitan, Austerlitz, and Bassano--that were staffed by skilled workers drawn from "marginal detainees" at Drancy, the internment camp in the Paris suburbs.
This logic of the event, its conjunction of lack and excess, even leads to the inclusion of battle scenes without a battle, in particular of Lukas von Valkenborch's "View of Antwerp with the Frozen Schelde" (approximately 1589), whose ekphrastic description in Austerlitz exceeds the actual scene into a virtual hallucination of the scenes as though it were "niemals vergangen." Fittingly, the closing chapter returns, by way of Sebald's narratives of Stendhal, a witness of the Battle of Marengo, to the related question of deferred evidence.
In thought if not always in reality, the writer and his largely alter-ego characters such as Austerlitz journey back in time and place; to haunting realities of the Holocaust and to the destruction of Germany itself by the devastations of aerial fire-bombing.
He should be able to hold his position to the third turn and, granted a clear passage in the second half, Austerlitz can up the tempo from halfway and come through with a determined challenge approaching the fifth bend.
This essay argues that Marpeck's activity as an Anabaptist leader--or, more precisely, the two documented phases of his activity from 1528 to 1532 and from 1540 to 1556--should be understood as part of a larger effort to establish an Anabaptist "church" initiated by the Anabaptist congregation in Austerlitz (Slavkov u Brna) in Moravia, also known as the "Austerlitz Brethren," whose early history from 1528 to 1531 played an important role in the narrative of the Hutterite chronicles.
Travel remains one of the most significant dimensions of Sebald's oeuvre, not least for Anglophone readers whose appreciation of the four prose narratives--translated as The Emigrants (1996), The Rings of Saturn (1998), Vertigo (1999), Austerlitz (2001)--and the long poem, After Nature (2003) as travel literature is not dependent on a knowledge of German.
Born Frederich Austerlitz in 1899, Astaire's lower-middle class childhood was devoid of any of the glamour of his later films.