auteur

(redirected from Auteur theory)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

auteur

(ōtör`), in film criticism, a director who so dominates the film-making process that it is appropriate to call the director the auteur, or author, of the motion picture. The auteur theory holds that the director is the primary person responsible for the creation of a motion picture and imbues it with his or her distinctive, recognizable style. Propounded most notably by the French director and film critic François TruffautTruffaut, François
, 1932–84, French film director and critic. Known in his early 20s as a writer for the influential French film journal Cahiers du Cinéma,
..... Click the link for more information.
 and the American film critic Andrew Sarris, it has been attacked by others, including Pauline KaelKael, Pauline
, 1919–2001, American film critic, b. Petaluma, Calif. Possessed of extremely strong opinions about movies and a feisty, pop-inflected style, Kael was noted for her provocative, passionate, and tough-minded film criticism.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, while a reading with Ranciere does get us out of the trap of modernist aesthetics that rely on the transparency of the medium and the authority of the author, in which auteur theory is heavily anchored, his film theory is not without its own restrictions.
Fellini does appear at the end of Sarris's article, as part of a confirmation of the reliability of auteur theory in ranking the "relative standing" of directors.
The closest we get to this in film studies is probably in terms of what is commonly called auteur theory.
In Chapter 4, the authors concentrate on using thematic criticism and the auteur theory in analyzing Chinatown (1974).
Such a choice of films, Badley contends, "exposes the Gothic ideologies underlying expressionism, surrealism, and, most recently, postmodern 'indie' auteurism, in which the truest auteur is the least 'healthy' and sometimes least technically competent--hence the least likely to be co-opted" (224), an argument that is a fresh addition to both film auteur theory in general and horror film criticism especially.
Developed in the mid-twentieth century, auteur theory focuses on the collision between "a film's 'author,' or director, and the filmic 'apparatus,' or the mechanical and ideological structure involved in a film's creation, distribution, and reception" (17).
Fitch cited the auteur theory of insurance: because Warren Buffett is an older man, it's negativity from here on out.
Auteur theory, in some of its applications, focuses on the points of intersection, cooperative and combative, between the film maker and the system (or 'apparatus') in which she or he operates.
Serendipity, like Cusack's whole career, illustrates the New Auteur Theory in action: Forget the old heroes, the people with the camera--they can't save us.
Film is 'personal', as the New Wave insisted, because each film is shaped and coloured by the particular vision of its director, and Wilson updates the sometimes romantic individualism of the original theory for a postmodern age by arguing both that the very differences between the films of an auteur display the shifting and various (rather than static and unified) nature of the creative self and that auteur theory can accommodate the spectator's own engagement with his or her personal fantasies.
Also in the cool column is the academy's long-overdue acknowledgment of the nearly half-century-old auteur theory, the critical touchstone by which a movie's ultimate quality is attributed to its director.
The auteur theory teaches that this objective powers the work as a whole.