authigenic


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authigenic

[¦ȯ·thə¦jen·ik]
(geology)
Of constituents that came into existence with or after the formation of the rock of which they constitute a part; for example, the primary and secondary minerals of igneous rocks.
References in periodicals archive ?
As can be seen from Tables 1 and 6 and Figure 2, the Staric sandstone is characterised by a relatively high degree of rock compaction (diagenesis), of which the concavo-convex to sutured grain contacts, authigenic silica overgrowths onto the detrital quartz grains or even intensive silicification of clay matrix are the microscopic indicators.
Authigenic clays in sandstones: recognition and influence on reservoir properties and paleoenvironmental analysis.
Mineralogy, geochemistry and cathodoluminescence of authigenic quartz from different sedimentary rocks.
There are massive authigenic quartz crystals spreading between the particles.
In a number of cases, these authigenic clays were found in fairly young craters, ones formed in the last 2 billion years or so.
Jordan samples from Arcadia, in Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, show originally rounded quartz grains with second-stage rounding of quartz overgrowths indicative of multi-cycling, and authigenic feldspar overgrowths that result in localized compromises to optimal frac sand properties (Runkel and Steenberg, 2012).
The above-mentioned eight chemical elements are related to organic, carbonate or other authigenic components of lacustrine sediments.
2005) and can be formed by either authigenic or diagenetic processes related to a chemical, physical, or biological change after its initial deposition.
If not fully removed, elements can precipitate as or become incorporated in authigenic minerals such as jarosite (K[Fe.sup.3+.sub.3][(S[O.sub.4]).sub.2][(OH).sub.6]) or Fe-oxyhydroxides.
These processes mainly reflect interaction of the basaltic glass clasts and glass rich matrix with the percolating water, including palagonitization, formation of authigenic clays, zeolites and calcite (Kabesh et al., in press).