autoignition temperature

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autoignition temperature

[¦ȯd·ō·ig¦nish·ən ′tem·prə·chər]
(chemistry)
The temperature at which a material (solid, liquid, or gas) will self-ignite and sustain combustion in air without an external spark or flame.
References in periodicals archive ?
For oil blending, low octane petrol (grade A-76/80) with a cetane number ranging from 20 to 25 and an auto-ignition temperature slightly lower (300[degrees]C) than that of RO would be the most suitable.
The auto-ignition temperature of gasoline has been estimated to be 600 degrees to 900 degrees Fahrenheit.
Overheated ovens, bearing elements, and electrical equipment can be ignition sources if they exceed the auto-ignition temperature (the lowest temperature required for self-sustained combustion).
5 Cetane number 55-60 40-55 Auto-ignition temperature (K) 508 523 Stoichiometric A/F ratio 9 14.
While generic "grease" might have an auto-ignition temperature in the vicinity of 400[degrees]F (204[degrees]C), auto-ignition of cooking oils occurs in the range of the high 600s [degrees]F (316[degrees]C) to the high 700s [degrees]F (371[degrees]C), depending on the blend of oils.