autoxidation

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autoxidation

[ȯ¦täk·sə′dā·shən]
(chemistry)
The slow, flameless combustion of materials by reaction with oxygen.
An oxidation reaction that is self-catalyzed and spontaneous.
An oxidation reaction begun only by an inductor. Also known as autooxidation.
References in periodicals archive ?
05) which revealed that the addition of SLE had a pronounced effect on the inhibition of auto-oxidation in these oils during long term storage at ambient temperature.
Auto-oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids involves the formation of semistable peroxides, which then undergo a series of reactions to form MDA.
The glucose auto-oxidation and protein glycosylation have the potential to cause a catastrophic damage as a result of the free radical attack, and complex antioxidant defence mechanisms have evolved to protect the body cells and tissues [3].
The contribution of fatty acids in process of auto-oxidation of is 24%, whereas the contribution of tocopherols in the inhibition of lipid peroxidation phenomenon was lesser than those contributed by the fatty acid profile [19].
The thiobarbituric acid reaction and the auto-oxidations of polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl esters.
Although in the auto-oxidation period, ihe two reactions progress faster and chain scission plays a predominant role.
The rate of epinephrine auto-oxidation was observed by monitoring the increase in absorbance at 480 nm every 30 sec for 150 sec.
It is possible that the coatings and bare steel to which the different biodiesel samples were exposed affected the initial oxidation rates of the different cases, but the external effects of the metals eventually became overpowered by the auto-oxidation of the biodiesel.
This is probably due to the auto-oxidation feature of b-carotene and its oxidative metabolites as previously shown (Palozza et al.
While oxygen is blown into the CL cell to start the auto-oxidation reaction to be detected as CL emission, alternatively nitrogen is used, especially during heat-up phases.
Aldehydes, mostly hexanal, are the most significant class of odorous compounds formed due to the auto-oxidation and photo-oxidation of unsaturated lipid compounds (Fig.