autoantibody

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autoantibody

[¦ȯd·ō′ant·i‚bäd·ē]
(immunology)
An antibody formed by an individual against his own tissues; common in hemolytic anemias.
References in periodicals archive ?
From here, patients with high disease activity and/or an SLE-specific signature are probed through the analysis of autoantibodies against interferon (IFN)-inducible genes such as SSA/Ro, SSB, SP100 and Histones.
While some controversy remains as to how autoantibodies induce glomerular disease, one hypothesis postulates that autoantibodies form immune complexes at remote sites, which are subsequently deposited in the kidney.
Chronic immune polyneuropathies and serum autoantibodies, in Rolak LA and Harati Y: Neuroimmunology for the clinician.
Direct immunohistologic examination of cicatricial pemphigoid biopsy specimens will detect complement and antibasal-membrane autoantibodies.
It has been postulated that more than 100 autoantibodies may be present in patients with SLE (41), suggesting that the relatively small number of autoantibodies that are routinely measured in the clinic does not properly capture all the available information regarding diagnosis, staging, and prognosis of patients with SLE.
suggesting that autoantibodies to a carcinogenic process occur quite early in the disease.
The presence and levels of certain lupus-related autoantibodies can also affect pregnancy outcome, Dr.
Of the 82 normal mice, none died, none had kidney damage, and 13 showed high concentrations of autoantibodies.
The contract is for the supply of reagents for the determination of autoantibodies by ELISA and IFA, along with the lease of laboratory equipment to perform signs, reading and archiving of results
today announced that it has received a $1 million SBIR grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to develop a biomarker panel to profile tumor antigen-associated (TAA) autoantibodies.
Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize the epitope specificity and IgG subclass distribution of these autoantibodies.
Patients with nailfold capillary abnormalities but no scleroderma-specific autoantibodies had a 26% long-term rate of progression to scleroderma, with roughly 90% of cases occurring within 5 years.