autobahn

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autobahn

a motorway in German-speaking countries
References in periodicals archive ?
Driving on the unrestricted stretches of Germanyas famous autobahns is one of the most common items in the bucket lists of petrolheads across the world but if the countryas aThe National Platform on the Future of Mobilitya committee has its way, a speed limit would be enforced.
EnBW will install the charging stations on German autobahns as it and other utilities companies, oil firms and start-ups stake a claim in the growing wave of electric vehicle business.
Fortunately, autobahns have no federally mandated speed limit for some classes of vehicles, and this baby is certainly one among them.
VETERAN movie star Sir Anthony Hopkins has once again proved one of the most prolific actors in the movie business by signing up alongside Sir Ben Kingsley to play a ruthless master criminal in new action-thriller Autobahn.
I have travelled (as a passenger) on some of these autobahns on a car journey from Paris to Berlin and back.
Most autobahns have no limits in a country that believes in "free driving for free citizens".
* Integrated nylon oil sumps for a new line of trucks made by Mercedes-Benz have begun to roll down German autobahns, paving the way for a potential torrent of conversions from aluminum, steel, and thermosets to thermoplastics.
According to the German media, Hitler's new autobahns, presented here as an aesthetic, social, project, were 'the greatest single masterpiece of all times and places', 'the sixth wonder of the world', 'greater than the Great Wall of China', 'more impressive than the pyramids', more imposing than the Acropolis', and 'more splendid than the cathedrals of earlier times'.
All very well if you have access to the autobahns. Over here, the car would probably not get out of second gear!
The researchers analyzed traffic data collected from sensors built into German autobahns. Besides freely flowing cars and a full-scale traffic jam, they first reported in 1996 a third state, which they dubbed synchronized traffic flow.
Even on German autobahns it's almost impossible to drive at 155mph, let alone faster.