autoignition temperature

(redirected from Autoignition point)
Also found in: Medical.

autoignition temperature

[¦ȯd·ō·ig¦nish·ən ′tem·prə·chər]
(chemistry)
The temperature at which a material (solid, liquid, or gas) will self-ignite and sustain combustion in air without an external spark or flame.
References in periodicals archive ?
The new knock model requires the very accurate calculation of the ignition delay times of both ignition stages as well as the temperature increase, especially because an inaccurate prediction of the low-temperature ignition point [t.sub.1] means the second integral will start too early or too late, leading to an error in the prediction of the autoignition point [t.sub.2].
Another good-to-know physical attribute of a liquid fuel is its autoignition point. Avgas will spontaneously burst into flames at a temperature of 450 deg.
The theory states that if piping contains a flammable gas and there is an inrush of fluid (or fluid transient) into the piping, the gas can adiabatically compress to its autoignition point (similar to a diesel engine), and then the gas, given sufficient quantity and pressure, can ignite and explode.