Autolysis


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autolysis

[ȯ′täl·ə·səs]
(geochemistry)
Return of a substance to solution, as of phosphate removed from seawater by plankton and returned when these organisms die and decay.
(pathology)
Self-digestion by body cells following somatic or organ death or ischemic injury.

Autolysis

 

self-digestion of animal, plant, and microorganism tissue. In autolysis the cellular proteins, carbohydrates, and fats break down under the action of hydrolytic enzymes in the cells. In living organisms, autolysis is evident in necrotic centers and in cells of malignant neoplasms. Autolysis occurs in decomposing corpses. In plants autolysis occurs after the death of living cells as a result of low temperature, desiccation, and the action of such poisonous substances as chloroform and toluene, as well as during mechanical tissue disintegration. Autolysis of microbe cells is evident in aging microbe cultures and in microorganisms damaged by physical, chemical, or biological agents. Autolysis also occurs in several industrial processes—for example, in tobacco and tea fermentation and during feed storage.

N. P. MESHKOVA

References in periodicals archive ?
Gomez-Guillen M, Hurtado J, Montero P (2002) Autolysis and protease inhibition effects on dynamic viscoelastic properties during thermal gelation of squid muscle.
The current concerns with biologies are their tensile properties, foreign body reactions, and documented autolysis.
The decreasing of cellulases production after optimum period may be due to nutrient exhaustion which stressed the microbial physiology resulting in the inactivation of secretary machinery of the enzymes and autolysis of microbial cells as reported by (32).
The production of adipocere is just one aspect of autolysis, the self-digestion of the body by bacteria in our gut that happily took care of the food we ate but are just as happy consuming our own tissue once we stop eating.
The process involves three stages: Enzymatic autolysis, Oxidation, Microbial growth [23].
It contains 13 chapters that describe errors in estimating the time since death; early work in the field; supravitality in tissues; rigor mortis; postmortem lividity; postmortem body cooling and temperature-based methods; autolysis, putrefactive changes, and postmortem chemistry; gastric contents; and practical casework.
As autolysis occurs, the site may feel boggy (Sommers, 2011).
Inhibition of cell wall autolysis and pectin degradation by cations.
The relative severe decrease in activity of the free [beta]-galactosidase might be due to its susceptible autolysis during the storage time.
com) against the Swiss-Prot database with the following parameters: Trypsin autolysis products, up to one missed cleavage, fixed carbamidomethylation of cysteine and variable oxidation of methionine, peptide tolerance of 50 ppm, and peptide charge of +1.
Effect of pH, temperature, and inhibitors on autolysis and catalytic activity of bovine skeletal muscle p-calpain.
In contrast to deeply sequestered soft tissues recovered from dinosaur femur fossils, it is unclear why remarkable ultrastructural preservation exists in these tissues in the presence of plant and microbial activity, autolysis, hydrolysis, wide temperature variation and the fact that the highly vascular bone was open to the influence of soil matrix.