AUTORUN.INF

AUTORUN.INF

A Windows text file that is stored in the root directory of an optical disc or USB drive that identifies the program to automatically run when it is inserted into the computer. See AutoRun and Win AutoRun.
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The most common threats in India are Win32/Bundpil worm, Win32/Sality virus, LNK/Agent.BZ and LNK/Agent.BS trojans as well as INF/Autorun, the most common variety of malware using the autorun.inf file as a way to compromise a PC.
Once successfully installed, the agency said, "the malware calls home to remote domains and downloads executable files(svchosts.exe, folder.ico, Autorun.inf) on the root of the secure digital (SD) card which are capable of spying onto user personal computer.
Although throughout 2012 all detections related to INF or Autorun malware family, variety of malware using the file autorun.inf on Windows computers as a way of compromising a PC, have been steadily decreasing in India, this threat continues dominating.
Although throughout 2012 all detections related to INF/Autorun malware family, variety of malware using the file autorun.inf on Windows computers as a way of compromising a PC, have been steadily decreasing in India, this threat continues dominating.
The autorun.inf exploitation code found in threats as diverse as Conficker and Sality tops out at 9.93% of detections, making it the most widespread exploit and the top e-threat of the month.
The worm, which first appeared in November 2008 and exploded in January 2009 -- in part because a new variant added the ability to spread using USB flash drives -- copied a malicious "autorun.inf" file to any USB storage device that was connected to an infected machine.
This spreads by linking to an infected executable from the Autorun.INF file found on removable media or network shares.
This setting will cause the USB drive to appear in My Computer as two devices: a CD (with the autorun.inf file) and a USB (with the content).
Do not install the "autorun.inf" file on the network and, in the Acros folder, only install the "Help" file on the network.
When the user puts a disc into the CD-ROM drive, Windows 95 immediately checks to see if there is a text file named AUTORUN.INF in the root directory.
Adrian (also known as "Irongeek") created the tool for professional security pen testers, but it has really shown how USB attacks can and will move way beyond "Autorun.inf" infectors.