Autumn

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autumn

[′ȯd·əm]
(astronomy)
The season of the year which is the transition period from summer to winter, occurring as the sun approaches the winter solstice; beginning is marked by the autumnal equinox. Also known as fall.

What does it mean when you dream about autumn? (fall)

The autumn season has mixed associations. On the one hand, the fall is traditionally harvest time, indicating a sense that one is finally reaping the benefits of prior efforts. On the other hand, it is associated with a winding down of energies before the barrenness of winter, as in the expression “the autumn of one’s life.”

Autumn

Autumnus
personification; portrayed as mature and manly. [Rom. Myth.: LLEI, I: 322]
Bacchus
god of this season. [Rom. Myth.: Hall, 130]
Carpo
goddess of autumn and corn season. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 53]
cornucopia
conical receptacle full of the fruits of the harvest. [World Culture: Misc.]
grapes and vine
leaves symbolize harvest of vineyards for wine. [Art: Ha11, 130]
Indian summer
a period of mild, dry weather occurring in U.S. and Canada in late autumn. [Am. Culture: Misc.]
References in periodicals archive ?
When Autumn is accepted to Dickensen Academy, she feels like her dreams have come true.
If you're a particular sort of person who likes to celebrate the exact moment Autumn begins, well, the Northern Hemisphere officially enters fall at exactly 10:21 a.m.
"Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower." - Albert Camus
I feel like a warm red Autumn." - Marilyn Monroe 
Today that tree is the biggest bur oak in the country, the pride of Indian Creek Farm, and a survivor of more than 400 winters, springs, summers, and autumns. Tag along as a native Kentuckian follows the life of this magnificent champion through a turn of the seasons.
The greens of summer are all but replaced by the yellows of autumn. The bur oak is still holding onto most of its leaves, but all the acorns have fallen.
Autumn, often used artistically as a portent of death, can seem like a time of regret.
Steve Jackson, of Bablake weather station in Coventry, said: "What this autumn has shown is that we tend to get very wet autumns every 30 years or so.
COVENTRY was soaked by 299mm of rain this autumn, making it the fourth soggiest since records began in the 1760s.