Avempace


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Avempace

Avempace (āˈvəmpās, äˌvĕmpäˈthā), Arabic Ibn Bajja, d. 1138, Spanish-Arab philosopher. Little is known of his life, but he was born in Zaragoza and died in Fès, Morocco. Developing the tradition of Islamic Aristotelian-Neoplatonism begun in the east by al-Farabi, Avemplace was the first important Spanish representative of this philosophy. Among his chief opinions was a belief in the possibility in the union of the human soul with the Divine, which later commentators found to be heterodox.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Omar Khayyam, Al-Biruni, Ibn Bajjah (Avempace) were among the great men of science and literature.
Ilai Alon (1989) studies the etymology of the word 'nawabat' and shows how Farabi uses the word 'nawabat' in a negative sense, while Ibn Bajja (Avempace) has a positive attitude towards it.
Se trata de un pasaje de la Summa Contra Gentiles III, capitulo 41, donde Tomas expone la posicion de Avempace sobre el conocimiento abstractivo de lo separado.
The other three Erasmus Mundus projects involved in the event were Avempace II, co-ordinated by the Technical University of Berlin, in Germany; Dunia Beam, co-ordinated by Pavia University, in Italy; and Peace, co-ordinated by the University of Santiago de Compostela, in Spain.
These philosophers include Alexander, Theophrastus, Themistius, and Avempace, in addition to Averroes, whom he treats as a primary source.
A classic polymath-philosopher, physician, astronomer, mathematician, and poet, Abu Bakr Mohammad Ibn Yahyah Ibn Al Sayigh Al Tujibi Ibn Bajjah, better known as Ibn Bajjah -- Avempace in the Latinised version -- was a master of logic.
From Ibn Rushd (Averroes) to Ibn Bace (Avempace), from Maimonides (Ibn Meymun) to Ibn Tufayl and Judah Halevi, a stellar array of Muslim and Jewish philosophers flourished in Islamic Spain.