Averno

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Averno

(ävĕr`nō), anc. Avernus (əvûr`nəs) [Gr.,=without bird], small crater lake, .6 mi (.9 km) wide, Campania, S Italy, between Cuma and Puteoli, near the Tyrrhenian Sea. Its intense sulfuric vapors, caused by volcanic activity (now extinguished), supposedly killed the birds flying over it, hence its name. The ancient Romans, impressed by its vapors and its gloomy aspect, regarded it as the entrance to hell; later the name was used for hell itself. Near the lake its personification, the deus Avernus, was worshiped.
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Averno

a crater lake in Italy, near Naples: in ancient times regarded as an entrance to hell
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(24) "Easy is the descent to Avernus /[...]/ but to recall one's steps and pass out to the upper air" is a task that can be accomplished only by "some few," blessed with divine favor (Aen.
then when they came to the jaws of the smelly Avernus, they quickly rise and dropping through the serene air, perch on the desired seats, on the tree of twin nature, from which the sheen of gold shone out with its contrasting color through the green branches.
6.126-29) Maturin could not love Avernus, where no birds wing.
Etymology: The name is derived from the Latin word "infernalis" in reference to the avernus and the dark coloration of the wings.
His looks do menace heaven and dare the gods; His fiery eyes are fixed upon the earth, As if he now devised some stratagem, Or meant to pierce Avernus' darksome vaults And pull the triple-headed dog from hell.
(17) Sackville also uses the word 'grisly' to describe Avernus and the mouth of Hell later in the 'Induction': 'first to the griesly lake | [...] An hydeous hole al vaste, withouten shape, | Of endles depth, orewhelmde with ragged stone, | Wyth ougly mouth, and grisly Jawes doth gape' (ll.
Where Clodia Pulcher, Catullus's Lesbia, had pursued her adulteries and Boccaccio's Fiammetta, abandoned by her lover Panfilo, had failed to find distraction among new temptations, and where neighboring Cumae and Avernus continued to offer access to the classical visions of prophecy and afterlife, Pontano was able to envision an earthly paradise of delight for himself and his friends.
O gods, for whom the countless crowd of empty Avernus serves as mere slaves ...
A cave by Italy's Lake Avernus, between Cumae and Naples, allowed Aeneas, the legendary primordial ancestor of Rome, into Pluto's underworld.
The only Latin I remember from my schooldays is Facilis descensus avernus: Easy is the descent into hell.
In a similar vein, Champlin argues that celebrations like the banquet of Tigellinus and the canal from Lake Avernus to the Tiber were intended to bring the upper-class delights of Baiae to the urban proletariate of Rome.
Cozens's 'The Two Great Temples at Paestum', Richard Wilson's 'Lake Avernus and the Island of Capri', and Jacob More's 'A Sunset with a Distant View of Rome'.