Aversa


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Aversa

(ävĕr`sä), city (1991 pop. 54,032), Campania, S Italy. It is an agricultural and transportation center, noted for its sparkling white wine. It also produces shoes, mozzarella cheese, and other dairy and agricultural products. In the early 11th cent. the county of Aversa became the first possession of the Normans in Italy; it later was made part of the kingdom of Naples.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(3) Seconda Universita di Napoli (SUN), Aversa, Italy
The always thoughtful former city councilman and onetime director of NFC Development, the city's banking arm, Ralph Aversa took time to wonder what effect Crogan's success would have on other festival and concert promoters who, like the Hard Rock Cafe, come to City Hall hat in hand, begging for taxpayer subsidies and other handouts.
Aversa, "Testosterone: estradiol ratio changes associated with long-term tadalafil administration: a pilot study," The Journal of Sexual Medicine, vol.
Aversa, "Haploidentical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute leukaemia in adults: experience in Europe and the United States," Bone Marrow Transplantation, vol.
These included "being a program where faculty and students interacted regularly," "being a program where students could receive individual attention if needed," "being a program where the faculty understood the issues confronting employed, part-time students with adult responsibilities," and "being a close-knit community." These aspects and how they were incorporated have been described in part by Aversa, Bajjaly, Barlow, Hahn, Lester, and Riggs (2009), and MacCall, Aversa, and Guenther (2006).
Kazim brings a deep understanding of the regional business environment and culture, and is highly respected for his contributions to the local economies," said Stefano Aversa, co-president of AlixPartners.
Many Hebrews worked most of all in dye-works: famous is tinta que vocatur Bascello, sited between Capua and Aversa. They had two graveyards, the former was sited in the centre, near the church of All Saints; the latter was sited not far from the town.
The world record living newborn was a boy weighing 22lb 8oz at Aversa, Italy, in 1955.
According to Guinness World Records, the heaviest baby to survive a birth was a boy weighing 22lb 8oz at Aversa, Italy, in 1955.