avian influenza

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avian influenza:

see influenzainfluenza
or flu,
acute, highly contagious disease caused by a RNA virus (family Orthomyxoviridae); formerly known as the grippe. There are three types of the virus, designated A, B, and C, but only types A and B cause more serious contagious infections.
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All subtypes (but not all strains of all subtypes) of influenza A virus are adapted to birds, which is why for many purposes avian flu virus is the influenza A virus.
Most outbreaks of the potentially deadly H5N1 avian flu virus among wild birds in the winter of 2005/06 occurred at sites where the temperature was just above freezing - around 0C to 2C, a study published in the journal PLoS Pathogens found.
The perceived risk of a flu pandemic developing from highly pathogenic avian flu virus outbreaks over the past decade has spurred pandemic preparedness plans globally.
The new swine virus had notably proved so far to be less severe than the H5N1 avian flu virus that has sparked fears of a flu pandemic in recent years.
Chan also raised the spectre of H1N1 mixing with the H5N1 avian flu virus entrenched in poultry in several countries.
Dr Chan said H1N1 may pose a particular risk when it mixed with the H5N1 avian flu virus, which is now "entrenched" in poultry in several countries.
Experts believe that the so-called 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic, which may have killed as many as 50 million people, began when an avian flu virus jumped to people.
The avian flu virus was found in laying hens at the farm in Banbury, and all birds on the site were slaughtered.
The avian flu virus was found on Tuesday in laying hens at the farm in Banbury, and all birds on the site were slaughtered.
The research, described in the January 6 online edition of <em>Nature Biotechnology</em> and funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), offers new insights into how the H5N1 avian flu virus currently circulating in birds would have to change in order to gain a foothold in human populations.
Although it gave a basic view of viruses there were some inaccuracies and low key comments with regard to the avian flu virus.
The longer the avian flu virus hangs around, the more opportunities it has to mutate into a form that can be easily transmitted between humans.

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