Avogadro's number

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Avogadro's number

Avogadro's number (ävōgäˈdrō) [for Amedeo Avogadro], number of particles contained in one mole of any substance; it is equal to 602,252,000,000,000,000,000,000, or in scientific notation, 6.02252×1023. For example, 12.011 grams of carbon (one mole of carbon) contains 6.02252×1023 carbon atoms, and 180.16 grams of glucose, C6H12O6, contains 6.02252×1023 molecules of glucose. Avogadro's number is determined by calculating the spacing of the atoms in a crystalline solid through X-ray methods and combining this data with the measured volume of one mole of the solid to obtain the number of molecules per molar volume.
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Avogadro's number

[¦a·və¦gäd·drōz ‚nəm·bər]
(physics)
The number (6.02 × 1023) of molecules in a gram-molecular weight of a substance.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
where I is the UV-A light intensity (1 mW x [cm.sup.-2]), [A.sub.r] is the illuminated surface area (18.49 [cm.sup.2]), [lambda] is the average illumination wavelength (350 nm), NA denotes Avogadro number; h denotes Planck constant; and c denotes light velocity.
where A is the molecular weight, t is the mass per unit area of the scatterer, and N is the Avogadro number. Equation (4) was used to find the integrated scattering cross sections between 0[degrees] and the corresponding angle, [theta], subtended by the detector with respect to the scatterer at position P2.
[N.sub.A] Avogadro number (6.022 x [10.sup.23] molecules/mol)