operant conditioning

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Related to Avoidance learning: latent learning, Operant learning, Primary reinforcement

operant conditioning

[′äp·ə·rənt kən′dish·ə·niŋ]
(psychology)
A form of learning in which the subject, in a given situation, tends to respond in a way that produces rewarding effects, reinforcing previous pleasurable experiences. Also known as instrumental conditioning; reinforcement conditioning.

operant conditioning

See CONDITIONING.
References in periodicals archive ?
Treadmill exercise enhances passive avoidance learning in rats: the role of down- regulated serotonin system in the limbic system.
Impairment of active avoidance learning and sensory motor reflexes in mice offspring induced by perinatal acute toxic exposure to selenium.
In the present study, we demonstrate that Ropren[R] profoundly improves passive avoidance learning and spatial learning in rats with Af325_35-induced amnesia.
Consequences of forebrain removal in avoidance learning. Hainsworth, Overmier, and Snowdon (1967) conducted one of the first studies focused on the effects of telecenphalic ablation during the acquisition of an avoidance task in fish.
One-way avoidance learning in female Roman High-Avoidance (RHA) and Roman Low-Avoidance (RLS) rats: Strain behavioural divergences and cellular density relationship in the basolateral amygdala.
Furthermore, both laboratory trials (Brower, 1960; Pilecki and O'Donald, 1971) and models (Holling, 1965) indicate that avoidance learning by birds increases as the proportion of model to mimic increases.
If a physiological problem has been ruled out, your daughter may have a form of "conditioned taste avoidance learning." This phenomena, which sounds more complicated than it is, has been extensively described in animals, but also in older children and adults.
I've found that the traditional behavior modification techniques of positive reinforcement, extinction (absence of reinforcement), avoidance learning (escape from unpleasant consequences), and punishment are often only short-term fixes to problems.
[7] One can hypothesize that an exaggerated antidiuretic hormone secretion in patients with needle phobia, as in the present subject, contributes to learning the fear of needles observed in needle phobia, since intravenous antidiuretic hormone administration in experimental animals greatly enhances avoidance learning. [10] Antidiuretic hormone has also been suggested as a cause of pallor and nausea in vasomotor syncope.
Explanations of avoidance learning postulate that organisms are motivated to both avoid or escape fear and seek safety (Rachman 1998).