obliquity

(redirected from Axial tilt)
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obliquity

(ŏ-blik -wă-tee) The angle between the equatorial and orbital planes of a celestial body.

obliquity

The characteristic in wide-angle or oblique photography that portrays the terrain and objects at such an angle and range that details necessary for interpretation are seriously masked or are at a very small scale, rendering interpretation difficult or impossible.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a comparison, Earth's axial tilt oscillates more mildly--between 22.1 and 24.5 degrees, going from one extreme to the other every 10,000 or so years.
These input parameters lead to an elliptical subreflector generatrix with eccentricity e = 0.830880, interfocal distance 2c = 104.776381[lambda], and axial tilt angle [beta] = 172.949[degrees].
Additionally, as discussed in Section 8, under certain conditions, measurement of axial tilt may be more advantageous than measurement of pure pitch, as far as the resultant accuracy is concerned.
For an Earth with a perfectly circular orbit but its 23.4[degrees] axial tilt, the noon analemma would be a vertical line extending over 46.8[degrees].
For instance, if there is a large variation in the axial tilt, the climate on a planet could be very unstable, just like how it was on Mars.
These results provide a means to understand the accumulation history of the polar deposits as related to Mars movements, such as orbital eccentricity, axial tilt, and rotation around the Sun.
These seasonal changes are caused more by the planet's 248-year elliptical orbit than (as in the case of Earth) by its axial tilt.
A good question because the latest work suggests Mars may have cycles of climate change every 10 million years, caused by changes in axial tilt, which may cause massive winter deposits of water ice on the surface at high latitudes.
As (https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/06/summer-solstice-first-day/?beta=true) National Geographic  described, the phenomenon is a result of Earth's axial tilt.
It's a visual representation of the way the Earth's axial tilt and orbital eccentricity interact during a trip around the Sun.
These dynamic seasonal changes are as much propelled by the planet's 248-year elliptical orbit as by its axial tilt.
The reason for this lies in the axial tilt and orbit of the planet in question, according to researchers from the University of Washington, who ran computer models in order to predict hospitability potential of planets orbiting in the "habitable zones" of G dwarfs or sun-like stars.