axil

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axil

the angle between the upper surface of a branch or leafstalk and the stem from which it grows

Axil

 

in plants, the point of divergence between a leaf and a branch. The axils of seed plants usually contain one or more axillary, or lateral, buds, from which may develop a leaf shoot or a branchlet of an inforescence, flower, thorn, or tendril.

axil

[′ak·səl]
(biology)
The angle between a structure and the axis from which it arises, especially for branches and leaves.
References in periodicals archive ?
We showed that, in the male inflorescences of Hydrocharis, the sequence of bifurcations that forms a cluster of flowers in the bract axils can be terminated by the formation of a stolon complex instead of a floral meristem and that a stolon complex can occur in the axil of the single bract of the female inflorescence.
Although vertebrates in Florida may use bromeliads as food, concealment, hunting grounds, or water sources (the free water in the axils), no vertebrates depend upon bromeliads in Florida as habitat for reproduction; it is the invertebrate fauna that will be most affected.
It is reasonable to suggest that insects may escape more readily from the leaf axil reservoirs of B.
It has strong, fleshy, hollow stems that root in the moist soil and produce oval, leathery, toothed leaves that support racemes of blue flowers growing from the axils. The plant may attain a height of 10cm and cover an area of one square metre.
According to DOH-NEC, mosquito vectors breed even in minimal volume of water which accumulates in tanks, cisterns, flower vases, plant axils and backyard litter.
The tiny white flowers are formed in the axils and transform into the familiar clusters of bright red berries, which are eaten by birds and deer, without ill-effect, but poisonous to humans.
The plant, which grows to about 60cm, is dioecious: having flowers of both sexes in the axils, transforming into the translucent berries.
The plant is distinguished by having a deciduous bark and although it is free from foliage for most of the year, its leaves are trifoliate with the flowers appearing in the axils, terminating in red berries.
It has dense, dark green, pointed leaves and produces small green berries from pink-white flowers that appear in the axils. Over consumption is very dangerous.
It has large, palmate leaves, which grow directly from the dark green or purple stem, while the aromatic, white, waxy flowers form clusters in the axils. The fruit is golden green with an orange centre, which is packed with round seeds, the fruits hang down on long stems that grow directly from the trunk and may vary, according to the cultivar, from 500g to 5kg.
The plant forms tight clusters of grape sized rhizomes and displays trailing stems that support cladophylls that are not leaves but actually branchlets with the tiny leaves appearing in the axils with small white aromatic flowers that transform into the pea-size red berries that are poisonous to humans and domestic animals.