Axis Sally

Axis Sally

[Mildred Elizabeth Sisk, (1900–) or Rita Louise Zucca, (1912–)] Nazi broadcaster who urged American withdrawal from WWII. [Am. Hist.: Flexner, 449]
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They included the conviction of an American citizen known as "(https://www.britannica.com/biography/Mildred-Gillars) Axis Sally " for broadcasting demoralizing propaganda to Allied forces in Europe from a radio station in Germany during World War II.
Wayne Mortimer Collins, D'Aquino's attorney during the trial and a prominent advocate for Japanese American rights, called the verdict "guilty without evidence." D'Aquino was sent to the Federal Reformatory for Women at Alderson, West Virginia, where Mildred Gillars, an America citizen who had broadcast for the Nazis during the war and was known as Axis Sally, was also being held (see the sidebar for more).
6) (a) Axis Sally; (b) Mata Hari; (c) Violet Szabo (George Cross recipient and heroine of the French Resistance, she was executed by the Gestapo at age 23 on or about February 5, 1945); (d) Tokyo Rose; (e) The "other" Axis Sally.
A few months after the horse manure incident, Axis Sally gave Corp.
From Rosie the Riveter to Axis Sally, women in World War II have been depicted as everything from defense workers and keepers of the home front to spies and demoralizers of American troops.
Sweeney General Ned Almond Robert John Burke Huggs Omari Antonutti Ludovico Omero Antonutti Rodolfo Sergio Albelli Axis Sally Alexandra Maria Lara (English, Italian, German dialogue)
"Axis Sally" in Germany and "Tokyo Rose" in Japan used popular songs and cooing femininity to try to talk Allied soldiers out of fighting.
The case of Japanese propagandist Tokyo Rose is well known but this book takes a look at the little-known story of Axis Sally, the German-based version of a female American collaborator.
American women--Tokyo Rose in the Pacific and Axis Sally in Europe--broadcast Japanese and Nazi propaganda over the radio to US servicemen stationed overseas.
What was Axis Sally's favorite strategy for demoralizing American soldiers?
Sheeran describes propaganda ploys by the Germans, including his own abortive interview with the treasonous German-American radio broadcaster Axis Sally. Unexpectedly, these are described more vividly than the few inclusions of combat.
2) (a) Mata Hari; (b) Tokyo Rose; (c) HRH Princess Elizabeth; (d) Axis Sally. 3) The Local Defence Volunteers (LDV), but Churchill didn't like the name and changed it.