Azores high


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Azores high

[′ā‚zȯrz ′hī]
(meteorology)
The semipermanent subtropical high over the North Atlantic Ocean, especially when it is located over the eastern part of the ocean; when in the western part of the Atlantic, it becomes the Bermuda high.
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Experts are predicting we could be in for a little well-deserved sunshine as the Azores High is currently building up northwards.
Later on Friday, the fleet faced a key decision on how to deal with the Azores High.
The oscillation, which is a difference in air pressure between the Iceland Low and the Azores High, can affect weather across the U.
The prevailing circulation here if western (latitude) air-mass transport, conditioned by interaction of the Azores high and the Icelandic depression.
Much like the Azores High or the Siberian High which you might have heard of, Saudi Arabia also has a dominant high pressure system.
On a positive note, the Azores High looks to be coming our way at present, promising far better September weather, so let's hope that we can enjoy a decent "back-end" to the season and that visitors flock here in the hope of viewing seal pups.
This would push all the low pressure systems (unsettled weather) on a path towards Iceland and allow the normally reliable Azores high pressure cells (settled weather) to reach the UK.
PWS said this summer could break records because the El Nino weather phenomenon, which warms the Pacific Ocean, combined with the effects of the Atlantic jet stream weather pattern and the Azores high pressure region.
The weather in Scotland is highly influenced by a semi-permanent pressure system called the Icelandic Low, and that in Morocco by another called the Azores High.
Bahrain Team Pindar faced windy conditions as Thompson made his way towards the Azores High, which is now just 400 miles ahead of him.
With the failure of the Azores high pressure system this year for the first time since 2001, we can expect to find many more Atlantic fronts bearing down on us, bringing rain and strong winds - bad news for sunbathers, great news for sea watchers - and you never know, one day that albatross might be out there.
He will then follow the South American coast northwards to the Equator, from where he must pick his way through the calms of the Doldrums and those associated with the Azores high pressure system, to round the island of Flores before returning southwards to the Cape of Good Hope.