Béchamp Reduction

Béchamp reduction

[bā′shän ri′dək·shən]
(organic chemistry)
Reduction of nitro groups to amino groups by the use of ferrous salts or iron and dilute acid.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Béchamp Reduction

 

a method of converting nitrocompounds to aminocompounds. The reducing agent is iron shavings; the reaction proceeds in an acidic medium (hydrochloric, or sometimes sulfuric or formic acid, is added). The Béchamp reduction is used for the synthesis of intermediate products in the aniline-dye industry (aniline, to-luidine, and so on) in solutions of electrolytes (such as iron salts or NH4Cl). The method was proposed by the French scientist A. Béchamp in 1854.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.