Bach

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Bach

(bäkh), German family of distinguished musicians who flourished from the 16th through the 18th cent., its most renowned member being Johann Sebastian Bach (see Bach, Johann SebastianBach, Johann Sebastian
, 1685–1750, German composer and organist, b. Eisenach; one of the greatest and most influential composers of the Western world. He brought polyphonic baroque music to its culmination, creating masterful and vigorous works in almost every musical
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). Johannes or Hans Bach, c.1550–1626, was a Thuringian carpetweaver and a musical performer at festivals. His sons and descendants were noted organists and composers. One of his grandsons was Johann Ambrosius Bach, 1645–95, violinist, town musician at Eisenach, and father of Johann Sebastian Bach. Johann Sebastian's eldest brother, Johann Christoph Bach, 1671–1721, was organist at Ohrdruf. When his parents died he took Johann Sebastian, his youngest brother, into his home and taught him. Of the 20 children of Johann Sebastian, several were well known as musicians. The eldest son, Wilhelm Friedemann Bach, 1710–84, was made organist at the Sophienkirche in Dresden in 1733 and later (1746–64) organist and musical director at the Liebfrauenkirche in Halle. He was a brilliant organist and well-known composer, but he did not live up to his father's hopes and, after a dissolute life, he died in misery. A younger son was Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (see Bach, Carl Philipp EmanuelBach, Carl Philipp Emanuel
, 1714–88, German composer; second son of J. S. Bach, his only teacher. While harpsichordist at the court of Frederick the Great, where his chief duty for 28 years (1738–67) was to accompany the monarch's performances on the flute, he wrote
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), and the youngest son was Johann Christian Bach (see Bach, Johann ChristianBach, Johann Christian
, 1735–82, German musician and composer; son of J. S. Bach. He went to Italy in 1754, became a Roman Catholic, and composed church music and operas. In 1760 he became organist of the Milan Cathedral.
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).

Bibliography

See P. Young, The Bachs (2 vol., 1978–79); C. Wolff et al., The New Grove Bach Family (1983).

Bach

1. Johann Christian , 11th son of J. S. Bach. 1735--82, German composer, called the English Bach, resident in London from 1762
2. Johann Christoph . 1642--1703, German composer: wrote oratorios, cantatas, and motets, some of which were falsely attributed to J S Bach, of whom he was a distant relative
3. Johann Sebastian . 1685--1750, German composer: church organist at Arnstadt (1703--07) and Mühlhausen (1707--08); court organist at Weimar (1708--17); musical director for Prince Leopold of Köthen (1717--28); musical director for the city of Leipzig (1728--50). His output was enormous and displays great vigour and invention within the northern European polyphonic tradition. His works include nearly 200 cantatas and oratorios, settings of the Passion according to St John (1723) and St Matthew (1729), the six Brandenburg Concertos (1720--21), the 48 preludes and fugues of the Well-tempered Clavier (completed 1744), and the Mass in B Minor (1733--38)
4. Karl (or Carl) Philipp Emanuel , 3rd son of J S Bach. 1714--88, German composer, chiefly of symphonies, keyboard sonatas, and church music
5. Wilhelm Friedemann , eldest son of J S Bach. 1710--84, German composer: wrote nine symphonies and much keyboard and religious music
References in periodicals archive ?
(62) See, among other sources, Durr, Zur Chronologie der Leipziger Vokalwerke Johann Sebastian Bachs, p.9, or the overview of the original parts to Bach's vocal works in Dreyfus, Bach's continuo group, pp.183-207.
A true son of the age of reason who missed experiencing only the first and last decades of the eighteenth century, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714-1788) belongs among the very few among his contemporaries who consciously and quite regularly demonstrated clear historical awareness regarding the music of their own time as well as that of earlier periods.
The first and largest section of Bach's estate catalogue (Hamburg, 1790; hereafter "NV 1790") is devoted to music for solo keyboard, reflecting the importance of these pieces to the composer and to his reputation.
While the scope and depth of the treatment of Bach's orchestral and chamber music is probably unmatched by any comparable reference source, it would be impossible to create a work on the scale of this Handbuch without the occasional slip.
Jahrhunderts, wobei hier die zentrale Person ganz allgemein fur die "Alte Musik", aber auch fur Bach (analog zu Nageli) in Zurich, der noch junge Paul Sacher ist der 1926 das Basler Kammerorchester grundete, und in der Folge die Schola Cantorum Basiliensis unter der Leitung von August Wenzinger, einem weiteren, das Musikleben in Basel pragender Musiker und Dirigent.
This year commemorates the 250th anniversary of the death of Johann Sebastian Bach, a man who was little known outside Germany in his lifetime but whose music, written "for the greater glory of God," has become ubiquitous and immortal.
Rifkin's view, that no more than one person sung or played from each part, is not only contradicted by the iconography of the period ..., but also by Bach's own Dresden material for the Kyrie and Gloria of the B minor Mass.
Yet there is a contradiction at the heart of Badura-Skoda's approach to performing Bach. As in playing the Viennese classics, Badura-Skoda espouses a modernist approach based on supposed fidelity to the composer's intentions, not the performer's feelings.
Wolfram Ensslin and Tobias Rimek ('Der Choral bei Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach und das Problem der Zuschreibung') discuss a strangely neglected area of Bach scholarship: his use of the chorale.
31-59), which focuses attention on Bach studies in general and on the work of Arthur Mendel in particular.
Dirst has formatted the volume in such a way as to lead the reader into a deeper consideration of Bach's keyboard legacy through a series of key questions: Why were these works crucial to Bach's historical legacy?
Gregory Butler's article, "The Choir Loft as Chamber: Concerted Movements by Bach from the Mid- to Late 1720s," further discusses the close interrelationships between the music Bach composed for the Collegium Musicum in Leipzig and the music he wrote (or rewrote) for his church services.