BBC Microcomputer

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BBC Microcomputer

A series of 6502-based personal computers launched by Acorn Computers Ltd. in January 1982, for use in the British Broadcasting Corporation's educational programmes on computing. The computers are noted for their reliability (many are still in active service in 1994) and both hardware and software were designed for easy expansion. The 6502-based computers were succeeded in 1987 by the Acorn Archimedes family.

xbeeb is a BBC Micro emulator for Unix and X11.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yes, there were other computers available, like the BBC Micro, but they were for rich children whose parents could afford to spend PS399 on a computer just because it had a nice keyboard.
Mary Whitehouse attacked the new threat of video nasties such as Cannibal Holocaust, and the invasion of the home computer, led by the BBC Micro and the Sinclair ZX Spectrum, began in earnest.
For anyone who remembers the wire-frame spacecrafts of the original Elite from back in the 80s on the BBC Micro, this update of David Braben's space exploration epic will likely bring a tear to the eye, with the Vive's headset allowing you to look around your craft and gaze out into space.
She would stare at the clunky old BBC Micro computer in her bedroom and learned to read early just so she could play the blocky, text-based games loaded on to the relic.
Upton grew up during the UK's personal computer boom in the 1980s, when idiosyncratic and affordable computers such as the ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC and BBC Micro opened up computing to millions of households.
Acorn BBC Micro Model B (1981) - included an analog joystick port as well as a"Torch" floppy disk drive with a Z80 CPU.
It was set up by Martin Edmondson who cut his teeth by developing games in his Tyneside bedroom for the BBC Micro, an early computer education project.
Mrs Valerie Wright, parents' association treasurer, is pictured with the cheque and some of the children who will use the Concept keyboard with the school's BBC Micro computer.
James Purnell, director, strategy and digital at the BBC, said: "Innovation at the BBC has never stood still, from the birth of radio and TV, to the first steps into the digital world with BBC Micro Computers and Ceefax, through to more recent services like BBC iPlayer.
Upton reminisces happily about his childhood coding on a BBC Micro, a rugged early personal computer from 1982.
Originally available on BBC Micro and Acorn computers, the original saw players explore space as traders or pirates, exchanging goods and gold with other travellers, or stealing it.