BBC Microcomputer

BBC Microcomputer

A series of 6502-based personal computers launched by Acorn Computers Ltd. in January 1982, for use in the British Broadcasting Corporation's educational programmes on computing. The computers are noted for their reliability (many are still in active service in 1994) and both hardware and software were designed for easy expansion. The 6502-based computers were succeeded in 1987 by the Acorn Archimedes family.

xbeeb is a BBC Micro emulator for Unix and X11.
References in periodicals archive ?
Linda Conlon, chief executive of the Centre for Life, said: "The BBC Microcomputer launched in the 1980s, inspiring a generation of hackers, coders and hobbyists, many of whom are today running today's tech industry and the world's most successful games studios.
I However, I used 'Folio' (a basic but wonderful word processor) on a single BBC Microcomputer shared by a whole Y7 class and was most interested in four things: we could save our work for another time, we could print out neat copies, we could move words from one place to another and most of all, we could delete and retype.
Revs was the first proper car simulation for the BBC Microcomputer.
Pupils also programmed BBC Microcomputers, popular in the early and mid-1980s.
Software includes a wide range of computer-assisted learning and applications software for the Apple and BBC microcomputers, approximately 25,000 books, 3,000 kits, including audio tapes, slides, transparencies, charts, etc., records and videos.