biceps


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Related to biceps: triceps

biceps

(bī`sĕps), any muscle having two heads, or fixed ends of attachment, notably the biceps brachii at the front of the upper arm and the biceps femoris in the thigh. Originating in the shoulder area, the heads of the biceps merge partway down the arm to form a rounded mass of tissue linked by a tendon to the radius, the smaller of the two forearm bones. When the biceps contracts, the tendon is pulled toward the heads, thus bending the arm at the elbow. For this reason the biceps is called a flexor. It works in coordination with the tricepstriceps,
any muscle having three heads, or points of attachment, but especially the triceps brachii at the back of the upper arm. One head originates on the shoulder blade and two on the upper-arm bone, or humerus.
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 brachii, an extensor. The biceps also controls rotation of the forearm to a palm-up position, as in turning a doorknob. The size and solidity of the contracted biceps are a traditional measure of physical strength.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Biceps

 

a muscle that begins with two heads. The arm biceps in man originates at the shoulder blade and is attached to the tuberosity of the radius; it flexes the arm at the elbow joint and raises it at the shoulder joint. The biceps of the thigh originates at the ischial tuberosity and the thigh bone, and it is attached to the tibia in the region of the head of the fibula; it extends the thigh and flexes the shin.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

biceps

[′bī‚seps]
(anatomy)
A bicipital muscle.
The large muscle of the front of the upper arm that flexes the forearm; biceps brachii.
The thigh muscle that flexes the knee joint and extends the hip joint; biceps femoris.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

biceps

Anatomy any muscle having two heads or origins, esp the muscle that flexes the forearm
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
* Type IV: For this type, the bucket-handle tear of the labrum extends into the biceps tendon, causing instability of the biceps-labrum anchor.
A transosseous repair of the short head of the biceps tendon was performed utilizing an Arthrex BicepsButton[TM] (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, Florida, USA) after whip-stitching the raptured tendon with #2 FiberWire (Arthrex, Inc.), (Fig.
[12] In the present case, the area where plaque and screw angulated under the scarred and contracted skin in the elbow joint which is the most common location of the wound dehiscence was covered with the biceps brachii muscle and by this way; direct contact of the instruments with the skin was prevented.
Prabhjot Cheema and Dr Rajan Singla [19] on the incidence of third head of biceps brachii in north Indian population was 2.3%.
Na comparacao entre as diferencas de ativacao do musculo biceps braquial nos exercicios, verificou-se que na remada baixa a ativacao muscular foi maior, apresentando uma media de (235,59[micro]V) contra (180,34[micro]V) encontrada no exercicio puxador frontal.
In this case, we suspected that the patient had disseminated tuberculosis because preoperative chest radiographs demonstrated left upper lung infiltration, which was likely pulmonary tuberculosis, and there was a soft tissue mass at the distal biceps tendon.
Rupture of the proximal biceps tendon represents about 90% of all biceps ruptures, which almost exclusively involve the long head of the biceps.
While the size of his biceps has led people to refer to him as the "Russian Popeye," doctors have raised concerns that he might one day end up losing his arms if he keeps using the chemical.
Exclusion criteria were those who (1) had a history of shoulder pain or injury and those of shoulder surgical intervention; of biceps tendinitis or injury; or of shoulder joint chronic pathology, including but not limited to such issues as osteoarthritis, Rheumatologic, or autoimmune disorders and (2) were pregnant or lactating.
Segato, who's gained notoriety as the local 'He-Man' and 'Hulk,' started injecting oil into his biceps, chest and shoulders five years ago.