Babbie


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Babbie

a young lady of good blood runs about in the dress and manners of a gypsy. [Br. Lit.: Barrie The Little Minister in Magill I, 513]

Babbie

gypsy wins clergyman despite opposition of town. [Br. Lit.: The Little Minister]
References in classic literature ?
Business first, pleasure arterwards, as King Richard the Third said when he stabbed the t'other king in the Tower, afore he smothered the babbies.
Ah, I often think it's wi' th' old folks as it is wi' the babbies," said Mrs.
This relationship is considered a moderate one in social work intervention studies (Rubin & Babbie, 1993).
Earl Babbie is a faculty member of Chapman University, California.
Our Western intellectual traditions, particularly as embodied in science, have largely embraced a view of causality that emphasizes determinism (Rubin & Babbie, 2001) and a relatively narrow view of cause as something that brings about change (sometimes called efficient causality).
Rubin and Babbie present students and educators with the eighth edition of their comprehensive introduction to social work research methods and theory.
This study employed a nonequivalent comparison group design (Rubin & Babbie, 1997) of battered and non-battered women.
It has been described and illustrated in a number of social work texts (for example, Bloom & Fischer, 1982; Bloom, Fischer, & Orme, 1995, 1999; Blythe & Tripodi, 1989; Rubin & Babbie, 1989, 1997).
If the reader agrees with current theory and research supporting a psychoeducational approach, the reader may view slight agreement as a glass that is slightly more than half full, which some might conclude is not bad, particularly in light of the fact that these were students and not experienced practitioners and that respondents to scales often avoid the most extreme response categories (Moser & Kalton, 1972; Rubin & Babbie, 1993).
Maxfield and Babbie aimed to include the most up to date methods and thoroughly illustrate the methodological approaches in the field.
Social work faculty's impression that students enter research courses apprehensively and with negative views has been documented in studies (Bogal & Singer, 1981; Lawson & Berleman, 1982; Poulin, 1989) and discussed in social work research texts (Royse, 1995; Rubin & Babbie, 1997).
Indeed, we found that seven of the nine most recently published social work research textbooks--Grinnell (1997), Marlow (1997), Monette, Sullivan, and Dejong, (1999), Royce (1999), Rubin and Babbie (1997), and York (1997, 1998)--recommended placing demographic questions at the end of the questionnaire.