plantar reflex

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plantar reflex

[′plan·tər ′rē‚fleks]
(physiology)
Flexion of the toes in response to stroking of the outer surface of the sole, from heel to little toe.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Total (n = 31) Location of monoparesis Arm 19 (61.3) Leg 12 (38.7) Motor score of NIHSS 0 12 (38.7) 1 16 (51.6) 2 2 (6.5) 3 1 (3.2) Sensory involvement 10 (32.3) Any upper motor neuron sign 11 (35.5) Hyperactive deep tendon reflex 10 (32.3) Babinski sign 1 (3.2) Chaddock sign 4 (12.9) Hoffman sign 3 (9.7) Lesion pattern Cortical involvement 25 (80.6) Multiple 20 (64.5) Lesion location Precentral knob area only 3 (9.7) Precentral gyrus with additional regions 14(45.2) Parietal lobe only 1 (3.2) Medial frontal lobe 7 (22.6) Subcortical regions 6 (19.4) NIHSS: the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale.
There was hyperreflexia and Babinski sign on both sides.
Still of major use in neurological clinical examinations for assessing dysfunctions of the pyramidal tract, the Babinski sign has recently been the subject of a debate whether it should continue to be part of a routine examination.
Subsequently, Cook et al (6) examined the reliability and sensitivity of 7 clinical tests: Babinski sign, clonus, Hoffmann sign, inverted supinator sign, hand withdrawal reflex, suprapatellar quadriceps reflex, and upper extremity deep tendon reflexes.
Significant findings on physical examination included chronic hemiatrophy involving his entire left face, as well as a Babinski sign on the right.
Direction of Ascending Ascending neuromuscular paralysis Ataxia Present Absent Deep tendon reflexes Hyporeflexia Hyporeflexia progressing to progressing to areflexia areflexia Babinski sign Absent Absent Sensory loss None Mild Meningeal signs Absent Rarely present Ophthalmoplegia May be present in Absent (external & North American TP.
On 22 February 1896, he submitted his article Sur le reflexe cutane plantaire dans certaines affections organiques du systeme nerveux central (On the cutaneous plantar reflex in certain organic affections of the central nervous system) to the Society of Biology (1) in which he first described the reflex we now call the Babinski sign. Following this submission, Babinski gave a lecture to the International Congress in Brussels in 1897 and, according to J van Gijn, (2) with this his international recognition began.
Nine (18%) had a positive Babinski sign, reduced rotular reflexes, and altered muscle tone (hypertonia or hypotonia).
Purpose: The Babinski sign is a finding known since the start of the teachings of physical diagnosis by almost all medical students.
To the Editor.--We read with interest the paper written recently by Jay on the Sign of Babinski.(1) We agree that Babinski did "his most famous communication on the reflex only 28 lines long."(1) However, we disagree with Jay on the correlation between this communication and the so-called Babinski sign; Joseph Babinski never called the upgoing toe as such.
Bilateral plantar reflex revealed the Babinski sign. In biochemical examination CK was found as 10535 U/L, and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) as 32.38 [micro]IU/mL (Table 1).