deciduous teeth

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deciduous teeth

[di′sij·ə·wəs ′tēth]
(anatomy)
Teeth of a young mammal which are shed and replaced by permanent teeth. Also known as milk teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
While some parents may think that because the decay is in baby teeth, it doesn't matter, dentists warn that if children don't learn to look after their teeth at a young age, they are likely to have dental problems throughout their lives.
She got this idea after a woman who had saved all her children's baby teeth asked her to make a piece of custom jewelry.
Puppies have six lower incisor baby teeth and on each side is the canine - the large pointed tooth.
Sheffield Hospital maintained that the teeth were baby teeth and had to be removed because they posed a serious risk to Sarah's airway.
Caring for baby teeth is important, as they help children chew and speak properly and hold space for permanent teeth.
The Store-A-Tooth[TM] service enables families to save their own adult stem cells from baby teeth ready to fall out, teeth pulled for orthodontic reasons, and wisdom teeth being extracted.
Damaged baby teeth also create a problem for permanent tooth to grow at their proper position, possibly resulting in crowded or crooked permanent teeth.
Stuff, like school exercise books and 20-year-old birthday cards, chipped mugs and the kids' baby teeth, is the ephemera of a life lived.
Like baby teeth sprouting in tiny mouths, baby steps are being taken to reinstate important early oral health care, some prompted by new early-childhood dental health regulations put into place for some federal agencies, including Head Start.
Tooth eruption and exfoliation are the terms given to the normal process of a pet's baby teeth being replaced by permanent adult teeth.
One by one, the baby teeth fall out until all 28 permanent teeth are in, usually by age 12 or 13.
When advocating the prevention and treatment of dental caries in the primary dentition, it was, and still can be, met with the opposing view that it's 'only baby teeth and they'll fall out'.