deciduous teeth

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deciduous teeth

[di′sij·ə·wəs ′tēth]
(anatomy)
Teeth of a young mammal which are shed and replaced by permanent teeth. Also known as milk teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Baby teeth have thinner and often weaker enamel, so have less protection against bacteria that metabolise sugar and cause tooth decay.
With baby teeth, we can actually do that," notes coauthor Cindy Lawler, head of the Genes, Environment, and Health Branch at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Bethesda, Md.
Specifically, the siblings with ASD had higher uptake of the neurotoxin lead, and reduced uptake of the essential elements manganese and zinc, during late pregnancy and the first few months after birth, as evidenced through analysis of their baby teeth.
The method of using baby teeth to measure past exposure to metals also holds promise for other disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Frequency and Percentages of Parents' Correct Responses to Oral Health Knowledge Questions Frequency Percentage Baby teeth are important.
1%) of the mothers agreed that baby teeth are important for child's health" and that decayed teeth can have effect on the baby's health" (96%).
Some youngsters are undergoing hospital operations to remove all 20 baby teeth, according to Dr Nigel Carter, the chief executive of the Rugbybased British Dental Health Foundation, who practises in the region.
LOS ANGELES -- It is a common misconception that tooth decay in infants does not matter since baby teeth fall out anyway.
A baby's 20 primary teeth are present at birth; baby teeth that emerge through the gums when a child is about six months old are used for eating and occupy the space necessary for the permanent, or adult, teeth.
Washington, Jan 17 ( ANI ): Baby teeth jewelry in the form of a necklace, or charms for a bracelet has become the next big thing.
Dental decay is one of the most common childhood diseases, with over 40% of children in the UK already experiencing obvious problems with their baby teeth by five years old - a statistic which has remained largely unchanged for the past 20 years -and dental extractions remain among the most common reasons for children in the UK to receive a general anaesthetic.
Lollipop is very proud of her teeth, and looks after them well, but she worries about the new teeth that will grow when she loses her baby teeth.