social behavior

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social behavior

[′sō·shəl bi′hā·vyər]
(zoology)
Any behavior on the part of an organism stimulated by, or acting upon, another member of the same species.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
At this time of the year, bucks are still in their predictable summer feeding patterns, and their bachelor groups remain unpressured.
If you've watched a bachelor group all summer and hung your opening week plans on tagging a patterned deer, consider the possibility that things will likely change.
Visitors will be able to see a variety of nocturnal creatures being fed, and encouraged to learn more about the bachelor group of 10 Rodrigues fruit bats and the breeding colony of around 60 Sebas short-tailed bats, during the new Discover More sessions, presented for the first time by a keeper.
Unfortunately, I was busted by a bachelor group of young rams that came out behind me.
Visitors will be able to see a variety of nocturnal creatures being fed and encouraged to learn more about the bachelor group of ten Rodrigues fruit bats.
Not just any elephant, mind you, but a particularly surly bull--one of a bachelor group of "problem" bulls intent on taking up permanent residency in a local village.
During this early period, mature toms will stick together once they come off the roost and go through a daily routine resembling that of a summertime bachelor group of velvet bucks.
For example, in June 2011, when the lease was under the state's Level 2 Managed Land Deer Permits (MLDP) program, they saw a "really nice buck" in a bachelor group. They later got several photos of him, and Cullen nearly had a shot in early bow season.
He will join a bachelor group within a newly-built exhibit at the safari park.
It's very typical of the experience hunters have when they happen to be right in the middle of the summer range of a bachelor group. Those deer are very visible and on camera all the time.
This behavior helps establish the pecking order within a bachelor group Without risk of injury; think of it as a couple teenage boys involved in a shoving match without real intent to fight.

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