Bacillus anthracis


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Bacillus anthracis

[bə¦sil·əs ‚an′thrak·əs]
(microbiology)
A gram-positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming bacterium that is the causative agent of anthrax; its spores can remain viable for many years in soil, water, and animal hides and products.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many species of animals can be infected with Bacillus anthracis either natural or experimentally.
Clinical importance of Bacillus anthracis cannot be denied, not only due to the fact that Anthrax, the disease it produces, may affect all the mammals, including human beings; but also due to the incidence related to deliberate intent of dissemination of the disease agent (Mebane et al.
2-4) Epidemiologic investigation indicated that the outbreak occurred because of accidental aerosol release of at least 4 strains of Bacillus anthracis from a military base in southern Sverdlovsk, Russia, designated Compound 19.
glaueeseens as a source of antibacterial agents against infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus anthracis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherihia coli, Salmonella typhi, Staphylococcus aureus, Candida albicans and Proteus spp.
What's more, given the ability of tea to bring solace and steady the mind, and to inactivate bacillus anthracis and its toxin, perhaps the Boston Tea Party was not such a good idea after all.
Bacillus anthracis (ANR-1), Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus were grown on nutrient-sporulating agar (Trypticase soy agar plus 50 mg/L manganese sulfate [MnS[O.
Anthrax is caused by the organism Bacillus anthracis.
is designed to be used along with other laboratory tests of cultures from patients possibly infected with Bacillus anthracis, and promises to provide a simple, quick means for identifying 8.
The researchers used Bacillus atrophaeus, a close cousin of the anthrax-causing organism, Bacillus anthracis, that is commonly found in the environment.
Commercially available hand-held immunoassays (HHAs) for the detection of Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis (the causative agents of anthrax and plague, respectively) were compared for sensitivity, specificity, repeatability, robustness, and stability.
In her presentation, Livermore biomedical scientist Lyndsay Radnedge discussed how the researchers have found 20 DNA regions or "signatures" unique to Bacillus anthracis, the bacterium that causes anthrax.