back-arc basin

(redirected from Back arc)

back-arc basin

[′bak‚ärk ‚bās·ən]
(geology)
The region (small ocean basin) between an island arc and the continental mainland formed during oceanic plate subduction, containing sediment eroded from both.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Keywords: Khanozai, Karezat, Urak Group, Alozai Group, Triassic, Kakar Khorasan (Back Arc) Basin, Pishin Flysch Basin, Muslim Bagh Ophiolite, Chromite, Quetta, Pakistan.
Manvir also became the first Kenyan driver to win back to back ARC titles, and indeed two continental titles.
Okamura et al., "Geochemical studies of magmatic hydrothermal activity in the DESMOS cauldron, Manus back arc basin," JAMSTEC Journal Deep Sea Research, vol.
During the CMT welding, the influence of welding speed rate in the heating area in the front arc is smaller than that at the back arc, making the heating area a double semi-ellipsoid instead of a single semi-ellipsoid symmetrical at the central line of arc, with the two semi-ellipsoid shape different from each other.
As a result, the Indonesian archipelago comprises a number of Middle to Late Tertiary-aged back arc basins strung out parallel to the main chain of mountains which has been thrown up by the collision of the tectonic plates.
After the M9.2 earthquake in Sumatra in 2004, aftershocks larger than M4.5 ceased for five years along part of a distant series of linked faults known as the Andaman back arc fault system.
Most of these diffuse seismic zones are found in back arc areas of collision zones, like Flores back-arc faulting behind the eastern end of Sunda arc and western end of Banda Arc.
These tendencies may be amplified, if at the same time, the crust is undergoing extension, such as in back arc regions.
During cruise 99 of the RV Sonne in January 1995 (Auzende et al., 1995; Halbach et al., 1995), many specimens of Ifremeria nautilei (Boucher and Waren, 1991) were collected in the North Fiji Back Arc Basin at the LHOS site (Ishibashi et al., 1994) at 16 [degrees] 59.65 S-173 [degrees] 54.73 E.
Although some volcanoes occur behind this line (in the back arc) none are supposed to occur under normal circumstances in front of it (in the forearc, closer to the trench).
By contrast, linear swarms that parallel the edge of a craton may simply be rift/breakup related (Ernst and Buchan, 1997) or may possibly represent a back arc rifting setting (e.g.