back-arc basin

(redirected from Back-arc spreading)

back-arc basin

[′bak‚ärk ‚bās·ən]
(geology)
The region (small ocean basin) between an island arc and the continental mainland formed during oceanic plate subduction, containing sediment eroded from both.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Himalayan arc; large-scale continental subduction, oroclinal bending, and back-arc spreading: Geologische Rundschau, 67, 37-48.
Local high rates of convergence at the Hellenic subduction zone (35mm/yr) are associated with back-arc spreading throughout Greece and western Turkey above the subducting Mediterranean oceanic crust.
Back-arc spreading systems; geological, biological, chemical, and physical interactions.
research community as the best place in the world to study the links between the geology, chemistry, and biology of a back-arc spreading center and to understand the large- scale cycling of materials from the seafloor to the Earth's interior and back again," Fisher said.
When arcs are stretched they split, initially forming a rift (an elongate depression bounded by high-angle faults) and eventually a back-arc spreading center.
Their protoliths were probably generated within back-arc spreading center and metamorphosed in a nascent subduction zone at depth around 50 km.