backbencher

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backbencher

Brit, Austral, NZ a Member of Parliament who does not hold office in the government or opposition
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite all her successes, A-Margaret Thatcher found that A-losing touch with her backbenchers was eventually fatal to her leadership.
However, it is not clear if the speaker wants to allocate a specific day for the backbenchers through amending the rules or he will use his discretionary powers to allow the backbenchers to raise their issues through speaking on 'matters of public importance'.
A second, led by former attorney general Dominic Grieve, has tabled an amendment to enable backbenchers to choose to debate and vote on Brexit issues one day a week, breaking with the convention about who controls the parliamentary timetable.
It would let him get back in the swing of Parliament ...people think he'd be ideal LABOUR BACKBENCHER ON POSSIBLE MILIBAND RETURN
A source close to the First Minister sought to play down the invitation to one-to-one meetings, saying: "This isn't the first time Carwyn has offered to meet backbenchers."
"I know some backbenchers have set the agenda out differently but I think over the next year we will get a lot more recognition for the way we have taken forward agendas around safeguarding children and schools.
According to Sydney Morning Herald, NSW backbencher David Coleman, who has a law degree, is understood to be drafting the alternative proposal.
Tory backbencher Andrew Bridgen said Britain had already donated PS600 million - more than the rest of the EU put together - and that admitting a few hundred people would make little difference to such a vast refugee crisis.
This has been tabled by the backbencher Stephen Phillips and is being supported by Labour.
A PROMINENT Labour backbencher has called for an overhaul of the Assembly's make up and number of Assembly Members - claiming the current system is "tribal" and doesn't allow backbenchers to do their jobs.
David Cameron insisted nothing could be read into the result because he had allowed backbenchers a free vote but Labour claims he has "completely lost control" of his party on the issue.
DAVID Cameron was last night under pressure from Tory backbenchers to defy his Liberal Democrat coalition partners and press ahead with the abolition of the controversial Human Rights Act.