nucleoid

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nucleoid

[′nü·klē‚ȯid]
(cell and molecular biology)
A discrete region within mitochondria, chloroplasts, and prokaryotes that contain molecules of deoxyribonucleic acid.
(virology)
The ribonucleic acid (RNA) core that is enveloped by a protein capsid in RNA tumor viruses.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
pylori is the consequence of mutations located on the bacterial chromosome.45 However genetic exchanges seem to be numerous between different strains of H.
Construction of plant bacterial chromosome (BAC) libraries: An illustrated guide.
The lambda phage genome is inserted into the bacterial chromosome using site-specific recombination between att sites in the phage and the bacterial chromosome.
A unique feature of phage P1 is that during lysogeny its genome is not incorporated into the bacterial chromosome as is commonly observed during lysogeny bo other bacteriophage.
To test whether these 300 or so genes alone can sustain life, Venter and his colleagues have contemplated making an artificial bacterial chromosome containing only those genes.
Restriction enzymes that can split the bacterial chromosome in a limited number of fragments (1 to 20) are required for the physical analysis of a genome (24).
The emergence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases has threatened the empirical use of cephalosporins and ciprofloxacin.8,9 Microorganisms use various mechanisms to develop drug resistance, such as recombination of foreign DNA in bacterial chromosome, horizontal gene transfer and altera- tion in genetic material.10 Resistance pattern of mi- croorganisms vary from country to country, state to state, large hospital to small hospital and hospital to community.
The washers (representing plasmid DNA molecules), twine (representing the bacterial chromosome of E.
In 1981, Kornberg led a team that determined the elements of an enzyme system that initiates DNA replication, called dna-A, of a bacterial chromosome. Since then, the Stanford group has been searching for another protein that appears to inhibit the replication process.
A filamentous bacteriophage (CTX[PHI]) integrated in the Vibrio cholerae chromosome encodes the cholera toxin, and Matthew Waldor (New England Medical Center, Boston, MA) described another phage (RS1) that flanks the CTX[PHI] prophage in the bacterial chromosome and is important for the CTX[PHI] prophage propagation.
Kyle Willis at the University of Wisconsin in Madison created the mutant bacterial strain of Pseudomonas syringae by inactivating a specific gene on the bacterial chromosome. The resulting mutant lacks the ability to cause disease.
Southern hybridization with a probe for ORF8 after PFGE demonstrated that, in all the ORF8-positive strains, the largest NotI fragment (size approximately 1,080 kb) reacted with the probe, suggesting that f237 integrated into the bacterial chromosome. Table.