bacterial infection


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Related to bacterial infection: viral infection, bacterial skin infection

bacterial infection

[bak′tir·ē·əl in′fek·shən]
(medicine)
Establishment of an infective bacterial agent in or on the body of a host.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, high-risk infants (by MRC) aged 29-90 days had a 42% smaller chance of having a serious bacterial infection than high-risk infants between 1-28 days old.
5 Therefore, determining whether patients with AECOPD have bacterial infection rapidly and early is especially important.
Given that the symptoms of influenza and bacterial infection often overlap, correctly diagnosing bacterial coinfection without a laboratory culture can present a challenge.
For this preliminary study, the researchers tested samples from 279 randomly selected infants (89 with bacterial infections, 190 without bacterial infections), along with samples from 19 healthy infants without fevers.
This warning refers to a specific Bacterial Infection called Folliculitis Nares Perforans.
Bacterial infection is primarily a clinical concept that may require the use of supportive bedside or laboratory tests to confirm or exclude.
Diagnosis of bacterial infection was based on clinical examination (fever, visible infections of skin and soft tissue), laboratory findings such as elevated markers of acute phase inflammatory markers (CRP, PCT), bacterial positive culture of urine, blood, ascites and skin swabs.
15), Nathan Seppa described injecting mice with tissue-building cells to help prevent an often fatal immune system overreaction that occurs when bacterial infections reach the blood stream.
Keys has been heard to give the occasional cough recently and unfortunately I have just received the news that his scope results have confirmed he has a bacterial infection,'' the Beckhampton handler told his website www.
We can't treat viral infections, but scientists will now look into whether treatment with antibiotics can help children when they have an asthma attack if they are also suffering from a bacterial infection.
In bacterial infection and sepsis, however, its level increases to 20-200 ng/mL and is related to the severity of sepsis.
The test detects elevated levels of procalcitonin (PCT), which indicates a bacterial infection, accompanied by a systemic inflammatory reaction.