endospore

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endospore

[′en·də‚spȯr]
(biology)
An asexual spore formed within a cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
As such, optimizing the technique and assuring the destruction of bacterial spores with any degree of certainty has been a challenge for public health authorities and defense agencies.
Meanwhile, strong chemistries have traditionally been used to kill bacterial spores in cleanroom operations, including formaldehyde, ozone, hydrogen peroxide, peracetic acid, bleach, chlorine dioxide, and hydrogen peroxide/peracetic acid blends.
Caption: Expand and flex: Energycan be captured from bacterial spores with an absorbent cortex layer (left) that swells when wet.
In the experiment, they slathered bacterial spores on one side of a sheet of rubber,a dn when the sheet dried it curled up.
The Xenex "robot" uses pulse xenon to deliver ultraviolet (UV) light throughout patient rooms, operating rooms (ORs), equipment rooms, emergency rooms, intensive care units (ICUs) and public areas to destroy viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores in just 5-10 minutes per room.
Their research revealed that PATP-induced inactivation of bacterial spores could be enhanced in this manner, and this approach could be one way to process low-acid foods using less severe heat and pressure conditions.
cereus treatments were weighed, homogenized in sterile saline (1 mg of insect tissue/100 [micro]L) and incubated at 70[degrees]C for 30 min to select for heat resistant bacterial spores.
According to research, the build up of bacterial spores in the air-vents can cause health problems, particularly for those already suffering from asthma, when the system is finally used again.
According to research, the build-up of bacterial spores in the air vents can cause health problems, particularly for those already suffering from asthma, when the system is finally used again.
Certain bacterial spores lie dormant in cold, dry and airless conditions for millions of years and become activated in favourable conditions.
Bacillus cereus was used to determine the effect of microwave irradiation on bacterial spores in contaminated materials.
The ultrasonic lysis method developed by Cepheid elegantly addresses these problems, even for the most recalcitrant target organisms such as mycobacteria, staphylococci, and bacterial spores.