Bactericidal Capacity

Bactericidal Capacity

 

the capacity of physical, chemical, and biological factors to kill microorganisms. The term usually characterizes the capacity to destroy all microbial species, although it is more correct to use the term “microbicidal capacity” in this context. Among physical factors, thermal and radiant forms of energy have the highest bactericidal capacity. The majority of microbes are highly sensitive to shortwave—specifically ultraviolet—radiation, which is widely used to disinfect rooms (operating rooms, wards, and so on). Chemical substances able to kill bacteria are called bactericidal substances. Bactericidal capacity is also inherent in human and animal blood serums because they contain a special substance (complement) and in tears, saliva, and milk, which contain lysozyme; gastric juice, which contains hydrochloric acid; and the skin. It is not clear why the skin kills microbes. Several factors are obviously at work: drying, the acidic reaction of the horny layer, substances such as lysozyme, and the disinfecting action of high-molecular fatty acids (caprylic, lauric, and others). Plants also secrete substances—phytoncides—that kill microbes and are widely used for therapeutic purposes.

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Table 2 shows the neutrophil and monocyte bactericidal capacity following HIIT or MICT.
This study shows that, in sedentary men and women, ten weeks of low-volume high-intensity interval training was comparable to moderate-intensity continuous training at improving neutrophil and monocyte bactericidal capacity while reducing CD16, TLR2, and TLR4 on CD1[4.sup.+] monocytes but not neutrophils.
Our data adds to this literature in suggesting that HIIT and MICT are equally capable of improving neutrophil bactericidal capacity and likely reducing risk of infectious episodes.
Although Robinson and colleagues did not assess neutrophil bactericidal capacity, expression of TLR4 was reduced following 10 days of MICT but not HIIT [20].
Critically, our data highlights that neutrophil bactericidal capacity can be improved by higher intensity exercise with significantly less time commitment.
bactericidal capacity is diminished in response to overtraining, muscle damage and elevated inflammation [37].
Evaluating the pastes for bactericidal capacity, it was observed that the E.
HBOT improves the bactericidal capacity of leukocytes by increasing the amount of oxygen in tissues.
Data from one microbe, Escherichia coli 8739, revealed that American robins (Turdus migratorius) had significantly lower bactericidal capacity than house sparrows (Passer domesticus) or gray catbirds (Dumetella carolinensis).
Chandra and other researchers demonstrated that iron deficiency results in poor immunity and reduces the bactericidal capacity of neutrophils and lymphocyte response.