Bacterium Bifidum

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bacterium Bifidum

 

microbes that constitute 80–90 percent of the intestinal flora in breast-fed children and suckling farm animals. Bacterium bifidum is a gram-positive, slightly bent rod (2–5 microns long), sometimes branching at the ends; it does not form spores. The presence of Bacterium bifidum in the intestine is beneficial to infants and young animals, because it suppresses the development of various septic and pathogenic microbes and promotes the digestion of carbohydrates. Para-aminobenzoic acid and pantothenic acid are necessary for the growth of Bacterium bifidum. Bacterium bifidum manufactures B vitamins (B1, B2 and others) and vitamin K. Upon termination of suckling, the bifid flora are replaced by the intestinal microflora characteristic of adults.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.