badlands

(redirected from Bad Lands)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.

badlands,

area of severe erosion, usually found in semiarid climates and characterized by countless gullies, steep ridges, and sparse vegetation. Badland topography is formed on poorly cemented sediments that have few deep-rooted plants because short, heavy showers sweep away surface soil and small plants. Depressions gradually deepen into gullies. The term badlands was first applied to the arid, dissected plateau region of SW South Dakota by Native Americans and fur trappers who found the area difficult to cross. South Dakota's Big Badlands, also known as the Badlands of the White River, are the world's best and most extensive (c.2,000 sq mi/5,180 sq km) example of this topography. Gullies have cut as deep as 500 ft (152 m) below the plateau's surface, and differences in rock type have created colorful and spectacular formations. The Big Badlands are famous for fossils of prehistoric animals. Badlands National Park, 242,756 acres (98,316 hectares), (authorized as a national monument in 1929, designated a national park in 1978) occupies most of the region. The park is noted for its scenery, its fossils of prehistoric animals, and its varied wildlife, including bison, bighorn sheep, deer, antelope, and prairie dogs. See National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (table).

Badlands

 

sharply and complexly disjointed low mountainous relief which is difficult to travel through and unsuitable for agriculture.

Badlands consist of an intricate set of branching gullies and the narrow ridges which divide them. They originate primarily in regions with a dry climate, especially where there are water-resistant clayey soils as a result of washing out by temporary (torrential) floods. They are widespread in most mountainous desert and semidesert areas of the world. As a result of irrational utilization of land and cutting down of mountain forests, badlands also arise in steppe and forest-steppe zones. The classical badlands developed in the eastern foothills of the Rocky Mountains in North America. In the USSR they are confined to the desert piedmont areas of Middle Asia, as well as Kazakhstan.

badlands

[′bad‚lanz]
(geography)
An erosive physiographic feature in semiarid regions characterized by sharp-edged, sinuous ridges separated by steep-sided, narrow, winding gullies.
References in periodicals archive ?
These are places where you can enjoy yourself without wandering into the Bad Lands that are found in every large city.
Like John Cawelti, he focuses on Owen Wister's The Virginian as a work that shaped eastern conceptions of western behavior, and he goes on to trace subsequent visions of role playing, individual courage, and increasing social and moral ambiguities that appear in Oakley Hall's Warlock, The Bad Lands, and Apaches.
Drummond, Hoot Owls and Orchids (1956); Oakley Hall, Warlock (1958), The Bad Lands (1978), and Apaches (1986); and Larry McMurtry, Lonesome Dove (1985).
Author Tony Wheeler has actually visited all the countries currently in the news--and his BAD LANDS thus is not just another travelogue, but the perfect choice for cultural insights for any who would understand either the cultures of the 'Axis of Evil' or travel conditions throughout.
Somewhere in Shropshire the traffic started to thin out, and tired, hungry and slightly bewildered we arrived at dusk at our cottage, shut the door and felt a million miles from the bad lands of the West Midlands.
The plot of the game is fine - you live outside the domed cities of the future, in the bad lands where life is tough, brutal and short, just like the inhabitants.
An admirer of Theodore Roosevelt, Hagedorn dealt frequently with that eminent figure--The Boys' Life of Theodore Roosevelt (1918), Roosevelt in the Bad Lands (1921), Roosevelt, Prophet of Unity (1924), The Rough Riders (1927), and The Bugle That Woke America--The Saga of Theodore Roosevelt's Last Battle for His Country (1940).